OKC Medical Briefs: December 8, 2004

By Centrella, Heidi R. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 8, 2004 | Go to article overview

OKC Medical Briefs: December 8, 2004


Centrella, Heidi R., THE JOURNAL RECORD


With the numerous reports claiming the state of the nation's health is, at best, mediocre and, at worst, in need of dire repair, corporations have joined individuals in the fight to get fit.

A recent American Management Association report, the 2004 Survey on Corporate Health and Wellness Program, shows the number of companies offering programs on self-care topics is up in several categories.

In October, AMA surveyed its members and customers at 211 companies about the wellness programs offered to employees. Results showed that 80 percent of executives felt corporate America has a responsibility to promote wellness, up from 71 percent last year.

It appears companies are taking action.

Twenty-seven percent of those surveyed said they offer more programs this year than in 2003.

Following is a comparison of the percentage of companies offering particular programs in 2004 and 2003:

* Exercise and fitness programs - 55 percent in 2004, up from 47 percent in 2003.

* Smoking cessation programs - 49 percent in 2004, up from 41 percent the previous year.

* Blood pressure management programs - 49 percent in 2004 compared with 36 percent in 2003.

* Weight management programs - 47 percent this year, up from 34 percent in 2003.

* Stress management programs - 46 percent in 2004, up from 33 percent a year earlier.

* Cholesterol management programs - 43 percent this year, compared with 27 percent in 2003.

* Nutrition programs - 39 percent in 2004, up from 25 percent in 2003.

Nearly 72 percent of respondents said they attend the wellness programs when their company sponsors them, up from 63 percent in 2003. But only 35 percent of the companies that offer the programs extend some incentive for employees to participate.

For more information, visit www.amanet.org.

ePPO up and running

Oklahoma City-based ePPO has launched a patent pending health care delivery program designed to improve the standard of care and clinical outcomes while controlling overall health care costs.

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OKC Medical Briefs: December 8, 2004
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