OKC Events: March 14, 2005

By Gilmore, Joan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

OKC Events: March 14, 2005


Gilmore, Joan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Six women will be inducted into the Oklahoma Women's Hall of Fame in a ceremony at 4 p.m. March 31 at the state Capitol. The program is sponsored by the Oklahoma Commission on the Status of Women.

The inductees are Wanda L. Bass, McAlester; Jeanine Rhea, Stillwater; Nancy L. Coats, Mary Fallin, Stephanie Kulp Seymour and the late Bessie A. McColgin.

Bass has excelled in her professional life as a banker and in her personal life as a philanthropist. She is recognized statewide for her donations to arts, educational and civic projects in the state, in the McAlester area and in Oklahoma City.

Coats, considered an active-retired judge, spearheaded the establishment of the first Mental Health Court in the region in 2002. She was appointed presiding judge of the court until retirement last year.

Fallin was elected in 1994 as the state's first woman and first Republican lieutenant governor of Oklahoma. Re-elected in 1998 and 2002, she has focused her efforts on economic development, education, health care and government reform.

Rhea is known for her work to facilitate and promote growth in diversity in the classroom and among working professionals. She has taken leadership roles through an annual professional business women's business leadership program by partnering with the Oklahoma International Women's forum. She has taught at Oklahoma State University's College of Business Administration.

Seymour, an attorney and judge, was the first woman appointed to the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, first woman to serve as chief judge for that circuit, first woman to serve as chair of the United States Judicial Conference and has been a leading force in establishing the Oklahoma State-Federal-Tribal Judicial Council.

McColgin was the first woman to be in the Oklahoma House of Representatives, elected in 1920, just a year after the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the right to vote. She was pregnant with her 10th child when she was elected.

The induction ceremony is free and open to the public.

Rich and diverse

The Napa Valley Vintners Association describes its wines as rich and diverse.

Oklahomans will have the opportunity to find out if this is an accurate description on Tuesday when the Vintners Association brings its worldwide tour to the Civic Center Music Hall downtown. From 7 until 9 p.m. a special wine tasting will be offered by more than 50 vintners.

Tickets are $69 per person and must be purchased before the day of the event. No tickets will be sold at the door. To purchase tickets, call 297-2264. All proceeds will benefit the Oklahoma Restaurant Association's Education Foundation and Allied Arts, the financial support group for 20 area arts agencies.

Hors d'oeuvres will be provided by the Oklahoma City Petroleum Club.

The evening's festivities will include a silent auction.

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OKC Events: March 14, 2005
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