Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Creates Student-Retention Program

By Page, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 23, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Creates Student-Retention Program


Page, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City has created a new program designed to improve student retention.

Funds for OSU-OKC's Pride program came from a $66,000 grant from the Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education, which has started an initiative to increase the percentage of Oklahomans with college degrees.

The Pride program will allow us to further reach students facing challenges in pursuit of their academic achievements, said Jerry Carroll, OSU-OKC president. Pride will provide a support system that will enhance our students' ability to succeed.

OSU-OKC created Pride to help identify and contact students who are at risk. Pride was designed to target students entering college for the first time to help them stay on a positive academic path and assist them in achieving their goals.

A coordinator will lead the program, and retention counselors will be hired for each of OSU-OKC's academic divisions. Support groups and counselors will work with students at mid-semester to begin planning the students' enrollment for the next semester.

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education awarded Brain Gain Improvement Grants totaling $300,000 to OSU-OKC and four other system institutions.

We are hopeful that these initiatives, along with others our institutions may implement in the near future, will help our state increase the number of Oklahomans who earn a college degree, said Cheryl P. Hunter, chairman of the state regents.

Rose State College in Midwest City will receive $34,000 for its Summer Bridge Program, which was created to help academically disadvantaged students.

East Central University in Ada will receive $67,500 to expand retention strategies it began last year, including career development and an early warning system.

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