Stakeholders Target Gaps, Disparities in Laws Covering Women in Oklahoma

By Price, Marie | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Stakeholders Target Gaps, Disparities in Laws Covering Women in Oklahoma


Price, Marie, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A cosmetologist convicted of a felony loses her license and cannot regain it after she gets out of prison, but attorneys and doctors who run afoul of the law can be reinstated and practice again, if they meet certain criteria, Anne Hodges Morgan told a group of women's advocates Wednesday.

We hope to be the catalyst for some genuine systemic changes, Morgan said.

Morgan, who chairs the Women's Foundation of Oklahoma, was among those addressing the first meeting of the Oklahoma Women's Justice Project at the Oklahoma Bar Center.

Gayla Machell, director of marketing and development for Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma, said the project is aimed at compiling laws affecting women disproportionately, identifying gaps and disparities and developing a resource guide for women to use to locate services.

The project is being funded by the foundation. Students from the law schools at the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City University and the University of Tulsa are undertaking the compilation.

Delores Beeler, with Resonance Center for Women in Tulsa, said that as a former felon, she cannot recover her right to vote until the term of her sentence expires several years from now, although she is out of prison and helping other women recover their lives.

Both male and female felons lose their voting rights.

Other speakers identified laws, policies and attitudes they say treat women unfairly.

Attorney Giovanni Perry said the current anti-immigrant fervor makes undocumented victims of domestic violence hesitant to contact appropriate agencies for help, fearing they will be turned in to federal authorities.

K.C. Moon, director of the Criminal Justice Resource Center, said a 2005 study found that one reason Oklahoma leads the nation in incarceration of women is that it imprisons people for many crimes for which other states do not mandate jail time.

Moon said these include many crimes women are more likely to commit, such as shoplifting. He said other states may arrest women at about the same rate as Oklahoma, but they do not send them to prison as frequently.

Bernice Mitchell, with the Governor's Commission on the Status of Women, said Oklahoma lacks programs to help such women.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stakeholders Target Gaps, Disparities in Laws Covering Women in Oklahoma
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.