Biofeedback, Counseling Business Grows in Durant Incubator

By Page, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 2, 2006 | Go to article overview

Biofeedback, Counseling Business Grows in Durant Incubator


Page, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A high school counselor has started a business that incorporates biofeedback technology and counseling at a business incubator in Durant.

"I was working from my home after school hours and decided I needed to have a physical presence in the community," said Debbie Blackburn Booth, a counselor at Durant High School.

Booth went through training in January to become a certified biofeedback practitioner. She purchased equipment this summer.

The brain can improve its ability to pay attention and develop more stability under stress through biofeedback, also called neurofeedback, she said. It enables people to alter their brain waves.

Biofeedback has been used for anxiety/panic disorders, dyslexia and other learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, bipolar disorder and eating and sleep disorders.

Biofeedback and Counseling is a fee-based company. Some health care providers will pay for services, Booth said.

Sensors are applied to the scalp, the forehead or ear lobes during treatment. The sensors monitor the brainwaves.

"While it isn't possible to promise with absolute certainty that individuals will respond to treatment, improvement is usually seen within 10 sessions," she said.

Her early clients have been children referred by school counselors or by word-of-mouth.

"I just know that combined with counseling, this technology has the potential to improve the lives of children and their families, and if I can help in that way, that's exactly what I'm going to do," said Booth, who has four children ranging in age from 5 to 18.

Booth also offers counseling without biofeedback.

Her company, Biofeedfack and Counseling, is in a business incubator at the headquarters of Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma Inc.

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