VA Tests Ability of Older Drivers to Motor Safely

By Wills, Rick | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 27, 2010 | Go to article overview

VA Tests Ability of Older Drivers to Motor Safely


Wills, Rick, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


For about 90 minutes, Eatilo Pellegrini displayed his driving skills by skirting around kids on bikes, maneuvering around a crash scene and meticulously stopping at every red light and stop sign.

"I think it went OK. It was just like driving. I felt like I was on the road," Pellegrini, who turns 90 in December, said about the driving test he took earlier this month on the VA Butler Healthcare's new virtual driving machine.

Pennsylvania imposes no age restrictions on driving -- only Illinois and New Hampshire require drivers older than 75 to automatically take a road test. Yet the desire for independence many elderly drivers have often clashes with public safety concerns, medical and transportation officials say.

"You can be 101 and still have a driver's license in Pennsylvania. There is no clear-cut factor to look at in terms of stopping driving," said Shawn Houck, a safety official with PennDOT who has run a variety of programs to help seniors adapt to life without a car.

The VA began its driving rehabilitation program and bought the machine late last year. It is one of several programs in the region developed during the past decade to test older drivers.

The program helps patients develop skills who need special vehicles, such as those with hand controls or a left-foot accelerator.

"Our program works with veterans to see if they are still safe to drive a motor vehicle," said Jill Umstead, an occupational therapist who conducts on-road tests at the VA and will test Pellegrini this week.

Pellegrini, who stopped driving at night a month ago, said losing his driver's license would severely limit his life.

"How are you going to get food and that kind of thing? How am I going to see my lady friend? I'd have to call a cab for everything," said Pellegrini, a retired cook and railroad worker who served in Iran during World War II, has outlived two wives and still lives in his own home.

Sharon Bopp, an occupational therapist at Butler VA, said many people fear becoming a burden on their families.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

VA Tests Ability of Older Drivers to Motor Safely
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.