Braddock Church's Tribute Concert 18 Months in the Making

By Kadilak, Karen | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 28, 2010 | Go to article overview

Braddock Church's Tribute Concert 18 Months in the Making


Kadilak, Karen, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Choir members at Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Braddock have practiced for more than a year for a requiem concert to be held Monday on the feast of All Saints and eve of All Souls in memory of dead parishioners.

The 28-member choir and a group of 16 professional musicians drawn from across the area will perform music from a Requiem Mass written by French composer Maurice Durufle in memory of his father in 1947. The work is set in nine movements and features themes from the Gregorian Mass for the Dead. Most of the thematic material in the work is derived from chant.

"We've been practicing this for 18 months," said Herbert Dillahunt, organist and director of music at Good Shepherd. "It's a good piece that I've always wanted to do. It's very lush and sung all in Latin. You have to know the Latin before you do the music. It takes time."

The choir worked on its own before joining the musicians recently for practice.

The concert caps a yearlong celebration marking the 25th anniversary of Good Shepherd Parish, which was formed in 1985 following the merger of six parishes representing various ethnic groups.

A seventh parish -- Sacred Heart of Braddock Hills -- was added in 2005. Good Shepherd serves the communities of Braddock, North Braddock, Braddock Hills, and Rankin. Many choir members are alumni of band and choral groups at Woodland Hills. …

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