Donal Logue Finds a Sweet Spot in 'Terriers' Role

By Machosky, Michael | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Donal Logue Finds a Sweet Spot in 'Terriers' Role


Machosky, Michael, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Donal Logue is the star of a show, "Terriers," that has a lot going for it.

It has a clever premise -- an ex-cop and ex-crook working together as private detectives -- sharp plotting, strong acting, critical acclaim and the backing of a network -- FX -- with a taste for taking chances, and a track record of pulling them off ("Rescue Me," "Sons of Anarchy," "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," "Justified" and so on).

"Terriers" has a scruffy, unkempt charm. Logue ("Life," "ER," "Grounded for Life") plays Hank Dolworth, a cop who left the force under less-than-ideal circumstances. He's kicked the booze, but can't quite quit his ex-wife. His partner, Britt (Michael Raymond- James of "True Blood") is an expert thief. Britt sees this as a chance to go straight, even if the kinds of things Dolworth asks him to do are only slightly less illegal than his old gig.

Together, they roam the low-rent, sun-blasted 'hoods of Ocean Beach, San Diego, sharing a beat-up pickup truck and clearly enjoying getting on each other's nerves -- no job too big or small. Then again, with so little separation between their past lives and present, the little jobs have a way of turning into big jobs very quickly.

"It has this feeling like the buddy shows of the '70s," Logue says. "But I think that we fight really hard to make sure that, emotionally, it's right on target. It's a little less 'case-of-the- week,' and a little more about the organic movements of these people's lives, and what they contend with, from my mentally ill sister to my relationships."

The show attempts to strike a balance between self-contained episodes and a larger ongoing story. So it's not necessary to watch "Terriers" from day one to figure out what's going on. (But you can catch up with On-Demand episodes.)

The show has picked up plenty of critical support, particularly online, in what Logue calls "blog-land." Some have affectionately noted its throwback-style appeal, like "The Rockford Files" with more contemporary language and subject matter.

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Donal Logue Finds a Sweet Spot in 'Terriers' Role
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