Seventy Could Testify at Sen. Jane Orie's Corruption Trial

By BobKerlik | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Seventy Could Testify at Sen. Jane Orie's Corruption Trial


BobKerlik, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


An Allegheny County jury of six men and six women is expected to begin hearing testimony Thursday in the criminal trial of state Sen. Jane Orie, the McCandless Republican accused of using state employees to perform political chores.

Attorneys interviewed 55 potential jurors for the case before Common Pleas Judge Jeffrey Manning settled on a panel. The jurors include a teacher, an airport worker and a contractor.

Manning identified as many as 70 potential witnesses to jurors, who will decide the fate of Orie, 49, and her sister, Janine Orie, 56, of McCandless. Janine Orie is an aide to another sister, Supreme Court Justice Joan Orie Melvin, who is under investigation by the county grand jury.

District Attorney Stephen Zappala's office contends that the senator and the justice benefited from the use of state-paid staff. Jane Orie is charged with theft of services and conflict of interest and related charges. Melvin, 54, of Marshall, has not been charged.

Orie has claimed the prosecution stems from her opposition to state-sponsored gambling, which the politically prominent Zappala family has supported.

Potential witnesses include Pitt Chancellor Mark A. Nordenberg; Orie's former Chief of Staff Jamie Pavlot; and Ross Commissioner Dan DeMarco, the Democrat who unsuccessfully challenged Orie for her Senate seat in November. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seventy Could Testify at Sen. Jane Orie's Corruption Trial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.