Pennsylvania State Trooper Admits Spoofing Ninja Criminal

By Peirce, Paul | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pennsylvania State Trooper Admits Spoofing Ninja Criminal


Peirce, Paul, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The mystery of at least one person dressing as a ninja in Fayette County has been solved.

Pennsylvania State Police Cpl. Charles Frey Jr., who is in charge of the crime unit investigating 11 vehicle break-ins and a near- stabbing in Fayette County on April 24, admitted on Friday to dressing like a ninja in a YouTube parody of the case.

Santino Guzzo told police he confronted a masked man dressed in black who was breaking into vehicles. When Guzzo went to get a closer look, he said the man attempted to stab him with a sword and then ran over a cliff.

In the parody, a man dressed in black, a dark mask covering all but his eyes, demands that police halt their investigation, then asks for a case of Milwaukee's Best beer.

"Yeah, it's me," Frey told the Tribune-Review.

Asked whether any state police equipment was used to produce or post the videos, he said, "Absolutely not." He declined further comment.

Frey later told WPXI-TV that he did nothing to harm the image or reputation of the state police. He said he posted the video just for the humor of it.

"I'm making fun of a stupid criminal. I see absolutely nothing wrong with it," Frey said.

State police press secretary Jack Lewis in Harrisburg said the agency "has no comment at this time" on the videos or whether the agency has a policy on employees' use of social networking sites. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pennsylvania State Trooper Admits Spoofing Ninja Criminal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.