Voices from Guatemala

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 29, 2011 | Go to article overview

Voices from Guatemala


Fernando, a licensed tour guide, is passionate about sharing Guatemala's history. He and his assistant led us to the historical sites of the City of Antigua and elaborated on the nuances of Holy Week. At our first meeting, he was quick to explain the credentials hanging from his neck that indicated he was, indeed, licensed by the Guatemalan government to act in this capacity. All "official" tour guides are licensed by the government.

With a degree of authority, they stopped traffic for our group to cross the street and kindly entertained any request from our group to adjust the itinerary. Both carried radios and were able to communicate with other official tour guides in the city.

As time went by and conversation became more casual, I was able to ask about Fernando's thoughts on the history of corruption and crime that Guatemala has endured. In a more quiet tone, Fernando reluctantly spoke of the tradition of governmental corruption, the ill effects on Guatemala's economy and the hopelessness felt by so many Guatemalans.

The current government of Alvaro Colom was no exception when it came to discussing corruption. His term as president will end in 2012, but his administration will continue on.

Guatemala's constitution forbids close relatives and the spouse of the president from being able to succeed him. Nonetheless, Colom's recent divorce from his third wife, Sandra Torres, will enable her to run in the next election. Torres has apparently played a large role behind the scenes during her husband's presidency and has already been named the governing-party candidate in next year's election. It is the expectation of Fernando, and others we spoke with, that she will win.

Among the rumors of corruption by the Colom administration, Fernando mentioned the past allegations that Colom and other high officials were responsible for the murder of Rodrigo Rosenberg. In fact, the Rosenberg case has been reported by Guatemalan newspapers as having created the greatest political crisis for Guatemala's democracy. Never before has a democratically elected president been accused of murder.

I remembered reading about this widely publicized case in the Prensa Libre. In May 2009, Rosenberg, a Guatemalan lawyer and father of four, was shot to death while riding his bicycle in Guatemala City. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Voices from Guatemala
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.