The Philosophy at Barca's Academy That Has Led to European Glory

By Fotheringham, Alasdair | The Independent (London, England), June 1, 2011 | Go to article overview
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The Philosophy at Barca's Academy That Has Led to European Glory


Fotheringham, Alasdair, The Independent (London, England)


La Masia has produced another superb side with a system English clubs could learn from, its director tells Alasdair Fotheringham

I am not sure if players like Iniesta, Pedro, Messi or Xavi would have had any chance of making it to the top in England."

A stunning statement when you consider the performances of those players in the Champions League final humiliation of Manchester United on Saturday night, but an even more stunning one when it comes from the director of La Masia, Barcelona's youth talent academy, through which those stars passed.

It's no exaggeration to say that La Masia, an 18th Century farmhouse in the shadow of Barcelona's Nou Camp, lay at the heart of the club's 3-1 win over United and therefore Carles Folguera, who also recalls a 12-year-old Lionel Messi spending his first few days at the academy sitting in a corner barely talking to anybody, is worth listening to. Eight of the Barcelona players who played at Wembley had lived their formative years at La Masia - since 1979 Barcelona's boarding house, which has 16 teams in total - while a ninth, Oier Olazabal, was a substitute and a 10th, Pep Guardiola, was in the coach's dugout.

"The physical aspect is not so important compared with the ability to take decisions, to play the game fast, technique, capacity for anticipation," Folguera says this week when I visit him in Barcelona. "I'm convinced that in many clubs in the world, and I'm talking to you about England because I've seen it there personally, where physical prowess takes priority, I'm not sure Iniesta, Pedro, Messi or Xavi would have had any chance of making it to the top. What we do [with our students] is a balancing act, where the parents, the trainers and La Masia are all factors.

"If we have a talented young player who's a little bit wayward, we try to give him focus without losing that spontaneity. He mustn't lose that individuality, but he has to know he's playing in a collective sport."

No one was better at knowing that than Guardiola. "Pep wasn't fast [as a player], but mentally he could contribute things that the rest did not," recalls Folguera of one of his star pupils back in the day when he was mastering techniques that have since led his club to European domination.

Folguera is about to deliver a 90-minute lecture at the 700- seater conference hall in the IESE business school on the philosophy and ethics of La Masia and just like the Nou Camp was last Sunday, when the latest trophy was celebrated on home soil, the place is packed.

Folguera has been at the youth academy, poetically called La Cantera (the quarry), since 2002 and can therefore take credit for the 2009 Champions League-winning team which beat United in Rome and had seven academy products in it (Valdes, Puyol, Piqu, Busquets, Xavi, Iniesta and Messi). Before his lecture he tells me it is special not only because of the senior team's success rate, but also because thinking outside the box and valuing all aspects of every player are critical.

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