The Journal Record Women/Minority-Owned Business Briefs: October 10, 2011

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The Journal Record Women/Minority-Owned Business Briefs: October 10, 2011


Record, Journal, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Northeast Academy receives grant

The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering Inc. has awarded the Northeast Academy for Health Sciences and Engineering in Oklahoma City $7,000.

Support for the program was made possible by AT&T's contribution of $150,000 to NACME.

Northeast Academy is one of only 10 schools selected from across the country for this support because of their commitment to enhance learning for minority students.

Minority business awards presented

National Evolution, Cherokee Data Solutions, I.S. Technologies and Cust-O-Fab Inc. were presented Outstanding Minority Business of the Year awards by the Oklahoma Minority Supplier Development Council.

The awards were presented at the 21st annual Minority Business Leadership Awards Dinner in Tulsa.

The Outstanding Minority Business awards were given in four classes: Class 1, annual sales of less than $1 million; Class 2, annual sales between $1 million and $10 million; Class 3, annual sales between $10 million and $50 million; and Class 4, sales greater than $50 million.

Natural Evolution Inc., a Native American company in Tulsa, was the Class 1 award winner. Natural Evolution is an electronics recycling company. Traci Phillips is president and CEO of Natural Evolution.

Cherokee Data Solutions, a Native American company in Claremore, was the Class 2 award winner. Pamela Huddleston-Bickford is CEO, owner and founder of Cherokee Data Solutions.

I.S. Technologies of Oklahoma City was the Class 3 award winner. I.S. Technologies is a provider of information technology and training services to the federal government. Iva Salmon is owner and CEO of I.S. Technologies.

Cust-O-Fab Inc., a Native American-owned company in Sand Springs, was the Class 4 award winner. Cust-O-Fab fabricates equipment for the oil refining, gas processing and chemical industries. Berry Keeler is president.

ConocoPhillips was selected as the Outstanding Corporation of the Year.

Southeastern, NEO receive federal grants

Southeastern Oklahoma State University in Durant and Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College in Miami have received $2 million grants from the U.S. Department of Education to assist Native American students and programs.

Chris Wesberry, Native American Center for Student Success coordinator, was principal investigator for the project at Southeastern, and Tim Boatmun, associate dean for academic services, was co-principal investigator. Also assisting in writing the proposal was Paul Buntz, grant coordinator-writer.

The Southeastern grant money will be allocated to the Connect2Complete Project, a program to increase retention rates and graduation rates of Native American students at Southeastern. About 29 percent of Southeastern's enrollment is comprised of Native Americans.

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