Ravens Safety Ed Reed Dares Steelers to Throw Deep

By Paulk, Ralph N | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Ravens Safety Ed Reed Dares Steelers to Throw Deep


Paulk, Ralph N, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


OWINGS MILLS, Md. -- The Baltimore Ravens are perpetually upbeat, mostly because of the presence of hard-hitting safety Ed Reed.

"Do these guys look uptight?" Reed asked while pointing to a scattering of pumped-up Ravens laughing it up before their final practice in pads in preparation for their rematch with the Steelers today at Heinz Field.

The Ravens are a reflection of their leaders -- Reed and linebacker Ray Lewis -- two former Miami (Fla.) stars still full of swagger. They carry a lot of weight in a locker room full of experienced, pressure-tested veterans.

Reed has been tested often by Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. He made the Steelers pay with two interceptions in the Ravens' 35-7 victory on Sept. 11.

"It's been their game plan for a while to challenge me and shake me up," said Reed, whose 1,463 career interception return yards are 20 shy of surpassing former Steelers cornerback Rod Woodson's total. "I don't know the method to their madness. It's all good."

"Detroit used to try to take Michael Jordan out when he went to the hole, but he kept coming back. Pittsburgh knows they are going to get a full game worth of play from me. They know if they don't account for me, it's going to cost them."

Reed's talent, intensity and unadulterated enthusiasm are matched only by Steelers strong safety Troy Polamalu. Reed is the antithesis of the even-tempered, soft-spoken Polamalu.

Reed and Polamalu might be worlds apart off the field, but they are similar in the way they play the game -- except Polamalu is a head-hunter and Reed is a ball hawk. Reed's 56 career interceptions are best among active players.

Yet, their styles fit perfectly for the No. 1- and No. 2-ranked defenses in the NFL. The Ravens and Steelers have proven they can win without either, but they are much better with them.

"I don't sit back and compare myself to Troy, but I study guys like Ronnie Lott who paved the way for me," said Reed, a seven-time Pro Bowler. "I have lot of respect for Troy's game. We talked about that at the Pro Bowl. We talked about taking our game to another level. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ravens Safety Ed Reed Dares Steelers to Throw Deep
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.