Pittsburgh Nonprofits Draw on Local Scenes for Holiday Cards

By Williams, Candy | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 24, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pittsburgh Nonprofits Draw on Local Scenes for Holiday Cards


Williams, Candy, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Even in this era of e-mails and tweets, there's something special about sending and receiving an old-fashioned holiday card.

Many area nonprofit organizations rely on sales of custom- designed cards this time of year to boost profits and achieve their fundraising goals. For the artists who create the images of familiar people and places depicted on them, the cards often hold a special place in their hearts.

That's certainly the case for Penn Hills artist Mary Lois Verrilla, whose 2011 holiday card for The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is a return after a decade to one of her favorite places to paint -- Schenley Park ice skating rink.

"In 2001, my skaters card was so popular, it sold out," Verrilla says. "Jeanne (Caliguiri, director of development at the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society,) asked me to do it again."

Last spring, Verrilla and her husband, Ed, went to Schenley Park to photograph the site so she could paint it from a different vantage point. In 2001, the trees had skimmed the skyline, but in 10 years, the tree tops blocked the view. Verrilla left the original skyline in her new painting, trimming the trees with her paintbrush.

Her husband passed away in July, and she made sure that she included his likeness in the ice-rink scene.

"He's the one in the Steelers jacket to the right of the rink," she says. "I always put my friends and family in my paintings. We were together for 55 years."

One of the youngest charity greeting card artists this year is 11- year-old Reeve Mulhollen of Ellwood City, one of four area young people whose designs were selected by Make-A-Wish Foundation of Greater Pennsylvania and Southern West Virginia. Reeve and her family received a trip to Walt Disney World, as did the other winners, Alivia, 14, of Stroudsburg, Monroe County.; Josiah, 14, of Morgantown, Berks Cuonty., Christine, 11 of Ridgway, Elk County.

Reeve says her mother, Kathleen, encouraged her to enter the card- decorating contest. Her design depicts a playful penguin sporting a red tassel cap. She hasn't yet shared the news with her friends.

"I didn't tell anybody yet. It's still a surprise," she says.

Here is ordering information for holiday cards and seasonal gift items from participating nonprofit organizations:

American Cancer Society: Pittsburgh artist Linda Barnicott's painting of Market Square, titled "The Golden Glow of Pittsburgh's Light-Up Night" is featured on this year's holiday card. It is available in boxes of 25 cards for a donation of $24 per box for one to three boxes, $22 for four to nine boxes, and $20 for 10 or more boxes. Imprinting is available for an extra charge. A limited number of previous years' cards and a vintage assortment are available for $18 per box for one to three boxes, $15 for four to nine boxes, and $12 for 10 or more boxes. Washington County artist James Sulkowski focuses on the Miller Homestead during the mid-19th century in his design, "Home for the Holidays -- Meadowcroft Village" for the Washington County Unit, for a donation of $25 for a box of 25, or $20 each for three boxes or more. Imprinting is available, and a limited number of previous cards and prints are available at a discounted cost. Details: 888-227-5445.

American Diabetes Association: A wide variety of greeting cards, calendars, cookbooks, ornaments and gift items are available from the association's online catalog. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pittsburgh Nonprofits Draw on Local Scenes for Holiday Cards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.