Pitt, CMU Circle Wagons around Research

By Nixon, Alex | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pitt, CMU Circle Wagons around Research


Nixon, Alex, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Pittsburgh's two major research universities are key to continuing the region's transformation from a manufacturing stronghold to a hotbed for startup companies in technology, the leaders of University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University said on Tuesday.

But cuts in government funding are threatening to hamper economic development work of those institutions, CMU President Jared Cohon and Pitt Chancellor Mark Nordenberg told about 200 people gathered for a meeting of the Pittsburgh Technology Council.

"You should all be concerned," Cohon said of what he called the massive disinvestment in Pitt by the commonwealth. "We all need to do something about that."

Pitt and CMU are partners in a dozen joint research centers focused in a number of technology areas, from computational biology to entertainment, said Cohon, who on Monday discussed college affordability with President Obama and 11 American university leaders.

Gov. Tom Corbett earlier this year proposed a 50 percent cut in state funding for universities. The final cut approved by the State System of Higher Education was 19 percent. Nordenberg said state funding previously accounted for about a third of Pitt's annual budget. It's now 8 percent.

There used to be "this sense that we all owed something to the next generation," Nordenberg said of public funding for higher education. "That feeling seems to have disappeared."

Budget cuts make it more difficult for Pitt to maintain and grow its research infrastructure, facilities and people, said Robert Hill, vice chancellor for public affairs. And if the university has trouble supporting research, it's less likely to receive the grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health that often produce medical discoveries and new technology, Hill said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pitt, CMU Circle Wagons around Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.