STRENGTHEN INTERDICTION, INVESTIGATIONS, AND PROSECUTIONS (Combating Human and Drug Trafficking along the US Borders)

By Council, National Security | Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, January 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

STRENGTHEN INTERDICTION, INVESTIGATIONS, AND PROSECUTIONS (Combating Human and Drug Trafficking along the US Borders)


Council, National Security, Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly


This Strategy sets priorities and objectives to help law enforcement and other applicable agencies at the Federal, State, local, territorial and tribal levels work together in a collaborative manner to target TOC networks their leaders as well as their enabling means and infrastructure in the United States and abroad. It is equally important that we build strong working relationships with our international partners to harmonize our efforts, and to ensure that they have the capabilities and regulatory and legislative frameworks to prevent, reduce, and eliminate TOC threats. Building upon the improved information sharing described earlier, the United States will leverage consolidated TOC databases to provide more accurate intelligence on known TOC members and their associates so they can more easily be denied entry to the United States or access to lawful immigration status, employment, or secure facilities.

This Strategy pursues TOC through criminal investigations and interdiction focused on both the net-works and their leadership. Criminal investigations will use an integrated approach that incorporates financial, weapons, and TOC-related corruption investigations into a comprehensive attack on the entire criminal organization. Interdiction efforts will focus on depriving TOC networks of their products, proceeds, infrastructure, and enabling means. The use of multi-agency task forces such as the ICE-led Border Enforcement Security Task Forces will remain essential to our efforts to investigate and interdict TOC threats at our borders.

To address recent TOC trends, the Administration will work with Congress on a range of legislative solutions to allow or enhance the prosecution of TOC enterprises and significant TOC activity that affects the United States. We will also enhance our anti-money laundering and forfeiture authorities to target TOC networks that pose threats to national and international security. Actions * Work with Congress to enhance U.S. authorities to identify, investigate, interdict, and prosecute top transnational criminal networks.

* Utilize rewards programs to assist in gathering information leading to the arrest or conviction of top transnational criminals.

* Issue a new Presidential Proclamation under the Immigration and Nationality Act to refuse visas/deny entry to TOC-affiliated aliens, corrupt foreign officials, and other persons designated for financial sanctions pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

STRENGTHEN INTERDICTION, INVESTIGATIONS, AND PROSECUTIONS (Combating Human and Drug Trafficking along the US Borders)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.