ANIMALS, SCIENCE, HISTORY: ; New Clay Center Exhibit; Covers Wide Range of Topics

By Busse, Sara | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), January 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

ANIMALS, SCIENCE, HISTORY: ; New Clay Center Exhibit; Covers Wide Range of Topics


Busse, Sara, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


From contemporary prints to Native American culture to a compilation of YouTube videos, the Clay Center has art for everyone starting Saturday. Three new exhibits will offer a range of artistic styles and subjects in the Clay art gallery through April 7. They are:

* "Why Look at Animals?": Organized by the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, N.Y., it answers the title question with selections that will make you say, "They make us laugh," "They complete our families" and "They are beautiful." Both familiar and unfamiliar selections from this famous collection will allow visitors to study how photography has been used to tell the stories of animals over the years. This exhibit is sponsored by WesBanco.

* "Migrations": This show is a collection of fine art prints from six Native American artists whose work, when combined, represents a wide spectrum of cultures and experiences. Created with the help of the University of New Mexico's Tamarind Institute and Crow's Shadow Institute of the Arts in Pendleton, Ore., these contemporary pieces put a new spin on traditional Native American art.

* "It's All Relative": Gallery visitors will see a natural phenomenon through digital means in this interesting look at a lunar and solar eclipse. Artist Michael Sherwin compiled 25 different YouTube videos into one incredible piece.

There will be a free public opening, with cash bar, for all three shows from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday.

In addition to the exhibits, Arif Khan, the Mary Price Ratrie Curator of Art, has put together a free art and science lecture series, underwritten by the West Virginia Humanities Council. The series focuses on the relationship between art and science.

The first lecturer will be Gail Wight, associate professor in the Department of Art and History at Stanford University, who will present "Scientific Inspiration: A Conversation with Gail Wight" at 6 p.m. Jan. 19. This artist/professor integrates science and its history into her artwork and shows how cultural notions of art and science have evolved over the years.

The second lecture will be "Creativity & Genius" with Rex Jung, an assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. …

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