Penn State 'Family' Gathers to Honor Paterno

By Cohn, Bob | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Penn State 'Family' Gathers to Honor Paterno


Cohn, Bob, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


UNIVERSITY PARK -- Joe Paterno influenced and shaped hundreds of players during his 46 years as Penn State's football coach, and it seemed as if all of them came together on Tuesday to say thank you.

Some were absent, of course, but the line steadily lengthened, curving around the block on a raw, blustery morning and afternoon. Men of varying ages and shapes but who shared a tradition waited patiently in the cold. It was a super-sized reunion with the requisite handshakes, hugs, catching up, swapping of stories and jock banter touching on expanding waistlines and receding hairlines.

Then it was time to say goodbye to their coach, who died Sunday at 85, and lend comfort and support to Paterno's wife, Sue, and the rest of the large family. A private funeral service will be held today, and a public memorial will take place Thursday at The Bryce Jordan Center. The 10,000 free tickets were claimed within minutes.

During yesterday's private viewing at the Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, members of Paterno's 2011 team, his last, filed past the closed, brown casket and blown-up black and white photo of the smiling coach. Then came the legion of those who previously wore the blue and white, an army nearly a half-century in the making.

"Just all his friends," former linebacker Rich Milot said. "This is what he built."

Paterno's casket, adorned with white roses, was flanked throughout the viewing period by a rotating honor guard of one member of the football team and one former player. The honor guard will stay in place during the duration of the public viewing.

Paterno's sons, Scott and Jay, hugged people as they exited in the afternoon.

Reflecting a recurring theme of the day, Warren "Moose" Koegel spoke of Paterno the person, as opposed to the coach who won 409 games over 46 years. What resonated, he said, was how Paterno always remembered the names of his family members, and how his mom adored Paterno.

"A lot of moms were glad their sons came here," he said. "They knew how well he would teach them."

An outstanding center who played on Paterno's early teams, Koegel went on to become athletic director at Coastal Carolina and now has the same job at Jacksonville State in Alabama. He arrived at midnight. "I had to get here," he said.

Others shared that urgency. Outside another entrance, the line for the public viewing started to form long before the doors opened at 1 p.m. It later extended for several blocks, almost a quarter- mile.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Penn State 'Family' Gathers to Honor Paterno
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.