Bible in Schools Not a Topic for the Legislature

By Kim Smith, Arizona Daily Star | AZ Daily Star, January 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Bible in Schools Not a Topic for the Legislature


Kim Smith, Arizona Daily Star, AZ Daily Star


Our view: Lawmakers should concentrate on the real-life problems facing our state

Teaching the Bible in public high schools - the goal of bills pushed by Tucson Republican state Rep. Terri Proud, will not put Arizona on an upward trajectory, it won't help the roughly one in five Arizonans who live in poverty and it won't bring jobs to our state. It won't stop foreclosures or boost the tanking real estate market. It won't help the working people the Legislature kicked off the public health-care system.

And for these reasons, among others, this push should be abandoned. The Bible is already incorporated into many high school literature, art and social-studies classes, and that's appropriate to give students the context of what they're exploring.

But Proud tipped her hand when she said there is no need to make sure the Quran also can be freely taught in Arizona schools. "The Quran hasn't influenced Western culture the way the Bible has," she said.

If the intent of the legislation is to ensure that educators can openly and accurately discuss the Bible's influence - Proud said she was prompted by teachers who told her they were hesitant to even mention God or the Bible in their lectures - then the protection should encompass all religious texts.

The Christian Bible should not be considered superior, or inferior, to any other religious text if it is in fact being taught in the context of world events, policy, art, historical events.

While Western culture is replete with biblical references, it is incorrect to say that the Quran plays no role. Founding Father Thomas Jefferson owned a Quran, and a translation of the text, because it was relevant to his study of law and the events of his world.

If students are learning about the Crusades, say, in history class, then it is impossible to explain the context of this monumental clash between Christianity and Islam - not to mention the geopolitical implications - without freely discussing the motivating influences of the Bible and the Quran. …

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