Black (Liberal) History Month

By Thomas, Cal | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, February 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Black (Liberal) History Month


Thomas, Cal, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Black History Month honors the achievements of African-Americans throughout history and that is a good thing.

Unfortunately, a reliance on family and faith, which allowed many African-Americans to survive the horrors of Reconstruction, racial injustice and violent acts of discrimination, has become a casualty of the modern welfare state, which has contributed to the destruction of family cohesion, supplanted faith in God with faith in government and fashioned many African-Americans into a Democratic voting bloc that has not improved the lot of the impoverished among them.

While African-American history is important, the way it is most often presented through a liberal political lens skews the contributions and examples of African-Americans who do not toe the liberal line. One especially sees this in the civil rights establishments response to Justice Clarence Thomas and more recently to Rep. Allen West, R-Fla.

West took to the floor of the House last week to praise what he called the Republican Partys contributions to civil rights. It is a history practically unknown among many African Americans.

Theyve been taught that Republicans are racist and care nothing about black empowerment. When examples to the contrary are presented to them, they often call white Republicans disparaging names and vilify black Republicans as insufficiently black.

The Republican Party, not the Democratic Party, West asserted, has consistently fought for individual freedom over the last 150 years. He said Democratic handouts to the poor have resulted in a modern form of slavery. Republicans, he said, reject the idea of the safety net becoming a hammock.

West noted that following Republican Abraham Lincolns Emancipation Proclamation, Republicans supported the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution, which ended slavery, provided for equal protection under the law and gave voting rights to blacks.

West added, It was the Republican-controlled 39th Congress that established the Buffalo Soldiers, an African-American regiment of the U. …

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