Junior Point Guard Jones Demands Best from Robert Morris Teammates

By Schofield, Paul | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

Junior Point Guard Jones Demands Best from Robert Morris Teammates


Schofield, Paul, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Velton Jones is the type of basketball player you could build a team around.

The Robert Morris junior point guard, a Philadelphia native, is tough, unselfish, hard-nosed and a leader.

In high school, Jones led Northeast Catholic to a Catholic League title. He's also carried the Colonials to several victories during his career, most recently hitting the game-winning 3-pointer to defeat Sacred Heart a week ago.

Jones makes everyone around him better, and if you don't follow his lead, he's not afraid to tell you about it.

So when Robert Morris (22-9) plays host to Monmouth (12-19) at 7 p.m. Thursday at Sewall Center in the opening round of the Northeast Conference tournament, Jones expects his teammates to play their best game.

"You have to prepare the right way and be ready to play in the game," Jones said. "It has to start in practice with communication and taking care of every little detail to a 'T.' You have to play hard to make the NCAA Tournament."

The Colonials defeated Monmouth twice this season (69-51 on Dec. 3, 81-73 in overtime Jan. 21), but Jones was a little shocked at how well the Seagulls handled NEC champion Long Island on Saturday, winning 106-78.

He's not about to take Monmouth lightly, especially after they had the Colonials down, 53-38, with 12:20 left in the teams' last meeting.

"I was a little bit surprised they put up that many points," Jones said. …

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