These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa

By Davis, KirLee | THE JOURNAL RECORD, April 26, 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa


Davis, KirLee, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Although the experiment has barely begun, the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education has already proven a successful University of Tulsa extension into downtown's expanding Brady District arts community.

That's an important point to university President Steadman Upham, who also has moved to establish a downtown medical school in cooperation with the University of Oklahoma's Tulsa campus. But that huge project still has two years of development before its first students enter those halls. The Zarrow Center hit the ground running last month.

"I was down there this morning just looking at the facility," Upham said in an interview last week. "It's beginning to come together as a real functioning facility."

The center has its roots in revitalization, not just of the 90- year-old Tulsa Paper Co. warehouse that's long stood vacant, but of a downtown blue-collar district that, in its 1920s heyday, played a bedrock role in Tulsa commerce.

The George Kaiser Family Foundation spearheaded the effort to revitalize that empty block, once home to four empty brick warehouses, as the centerpiece for a resurgent arts district. With the support of the foundation, TU, the Gilcrease Museum that is managed by TU, and the Philbrook Museum of Art, Manhattan Construction has spent the last year revitalizing three of the four warehouses.

This spring Manhattan finished the three-story, 18,000-square- foot Tulsa Paper Co. portion, which TU and Gilcrease operate. The Philbrook portion should open later this year.

The Zarrow Center's first floor will provide rotating art exhibit space for both instructional use and public entertainment.

"We've done this at Gilcrease in the past," Upham said of coordinating art and historical exhibits with public school educational programs. "We wanted to expand that."

The space also offers TU a platform for displaying artworks by its students, faculty and visiting artists, with a bar and other features for hosting gatherings.

"They'll be rotating exhibitions of art that really come out of the university environment," Upham said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

These Walls: Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, Tulsa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?