A Typhoon, a Baby, and Spiritual Light

By Rosalie E Dunbar News editor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

A Typhoon, a Baby, and Spiritual Light


Rosalie E Dunbar News editor, The Christian Science Monitor


In the midst of reports about Asia's typhoons and earthquakes, there was a gentle image: a baby looking up into the eyes of a rescue worker, who was tenderly holding the child (Agence France- Press). In recent days, the Philippines, Taiwan, and China have been battered by typhoon Morakot, which left hundreds of people missing and others dead. Taiwan has experienced record rains and the worst flooding in half a century; a mudslide has covered a rural village.

Japan's west coast was struck by typhoon Etau, which left at least 12 people dead. In addition, Japan had earthquakes two days in a row, measuring magnitudes of 6.9 and 6.6 respectively. Around the same time, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake in the Andaman Islands prompted a tsunami watch for India, Burma (Myanmar), Indonesia, Thailand, and Bangladesh. Continuing rain has hampered rescue efforts.

The photo of the child and the rescue worker is one among many, most of which show scenes of destruction. Yet its tender message shines as a ray of hope. Anyone who has ever spoken to rescuers knows the energy, strength, and devotion they bring to their work, even against overwhelming odds. The energizing power behind all of those qualities is divine Love, which leads us to love our neighbors and to want to help them. As the Bible tells us, "God is love" (I John 4:8). This is a far cry from the image of God as one who sends suffering to test people or purify them. Rather, divine Love preserves life and peace.

Our prayers on behalf of those who are suffering through these storms and earthquakes can do much to strengthen and guide their efforts. By recognizing each individual as the spiritual idea of God, we are seeing them as fully empowered and strengthened by Love.

Mary Baker Eddy, who founded this newspaper, wrote the following in "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures": "It is proverbial that Florence Nightingale and other philanthropists engaged in humane labors have been able to undergo without sinking fatigues and exposures which ordinary people could not endure. The explanation lies in the support which they derived from the divine law, rising above the human. The spiritual demand, quelling the material, supplies energy and endurance surpassing all other aids, and forestalls the penalty which our beliefs would attach to our best deeds" (p. …

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