Joe Lieberman's Line in the Sand over Senate Healthcare Reform

By Grier, Peter | The Christian Science Monitor, December 14, 2009 | Go to article overview

Joe Lieberman's Line in the Sand over Senate Healthcare Reform


Grier, Peter, The Christian Science Monitor


Independent Sen. Joe Lieberman indicates he won't go for a healthcare reform bill with anything resembling a public option - including the Medicare buy-in compromise. If he prevails, what are the choices for liberals who want the public option?

Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I) of Connecticut has emerged as perhaps the key player in the fate of healthcare reform legislation in the Senate - infuriating many Democrats, who accuse him of acting less out of a sense of principle than a desire to protect insurance companies, a key industry in his state.

But as Senator Lieberman and his fellow moderates push the Senate's massive health bill toward the right, the hard political fact is that it is liberals, not Lieberman, who may soon have to make a tough decision.

It now appears possible that the legislation might not include anything that resembles a public option - government-run insurance intended to compete with private firms. If that's the case, will liberals vote for it anyway? After all, many Democrats on the more leftward side of the party have long insisted that the public option is something that a health bill absolutely, positively must have.

"[Senate majority leader] Harry Reid is in just a terrible spot. Do you go you with a bill that in effect offends the base?" says health insurance industry consultant Robert Laszewski.

For Democrats, the problem is that they need to get 60 votes to ensure a filibuster-proof majority for healthcare reform. Their caucus - which includes Lieberman - numbers 60 senators. While they might be able to attract a few Republicans, such as Sen. Olympia Snowe (R) of Maine, their margin for error is essentially nil.

Enter Joe. Lieberman in essence seized control of the healthcare overhaul on Sunday by announcing his opposition to a plan to allow uninsured individuals as young as 55 to buy into Medicare. The Medicare buy-in is a crucial part of a compromise intended to ease the concerns of moderates about the public option. That compromise is now unravelling, as Lieberman made clear that he won't vote for anything that can be construed as government competition for private health firms.

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Joe Lieberman's Line in the Sand over Senate Healthcare Reform
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