Was Rep. Tom Perriello Targeted for His Vote on Healthcare Bill?

By Chaddock, Gail Russell | The Christian Science Monitor, March 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Was Rep. Tom Perriello Targeted for His Vote on Healthcare Bill?


Chaddock, Gail Russell, The Christian Science Monitor


Democrats have reported 10 incidents of threats and violence against members who voted for the healthcare bill Sunday. It is so far unclear whether the gas line at Rep. Tom Perriello's brother's house was cut as an attempt at revenge.

As a human rights activist, Rep. Tom Perriello (D) of Virginia, saw some of the world's hottest spots - Kosovo, Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, and Darfur. But he never expected to bring danger to his doorstep with a vote cast on the floor of the House or Representatives for a healthcare bill.

As of Wednesday afternoon, the FBI was investigating whether a severed gas line at the home of Congressman Perriello's brother was related to a comment posted on a local "tea party" website for activists to "drop by" and "express their thanks" for his healthcare vote and to "remember exactly what it is their constituents are saying and how they are telling them to vote."

The site mistakenly directed activists to Perriello's brother's address.

His case - not yet conclusively related to his "yes" healthcare vote Sunday - is one of some 10 incidents and threats reported in the last 72 hours against members supporting healthcare reform, say House Democratic leaders.

Incidents include death threats, bricks through windows of member and Democratic party offices, and incidents of spitting and yelling racial epithets at members of the Congressional Black Caucus as they walked through an anti-healthcare demonstration at the Capitol Saturday.

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Was Rep. Tom Perriello Targeted for His Vote on Healthcare Bill?
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