Supreme Court Rules for African-Americans in Firefighter Hiring Case

By Richey, Warren | The Christian Science Monitor, May 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Supreme Court Rules for African-Americans in Firefighter Hiring Case


Richey, Warren, The Christian Science Monitor


Some 6,000 African-American applicants for jobs with the Chicago Fire Department can proceed with a discrimination lawsuit over the firefighter hiring test, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The US Supreme Court ruled on Monday that some 6,000 African- American job applicants are entitled to pursue a discrimination lawsuit claiming a Chicago Fire Department hiring test created a disparate impact against minority candidates.

The justices unanimously reversed a federal appeals court decision that had thrown out the group's class-action lawsuit on grounds that they had filed their challenge after a 300-day deadline had passed.

Writing for the court, Justice Antonin Scalia said lawsuits attacking ongoing employment practices that result in disparate impacts against minority groups are not tied to the same 300-day limitations period.

The decision marks the second time in two years the high court has grappled with claims of employment discrimination in fire department hiring tests. Last year the court ruled 5 to 4 for a group of white firefighters in New Haven, Conn., who claimed the city discriminated against them when it threw out a hiring test they had passed but in which no African-Americans tested high enough to win a promotion.

In the Chicago case, it was African-American applicants who sued, claiming that they suffered a disparate impact when the city divided candidates who passed a hiring test into two groups: "qualified" and "well qualified."

A low proportion of African-Americans were in the "well- qualified" group that was used for hiring.

The dispute in Lewis v. City of Chicago stems from a 1995 test administered to 26,000 applicants to become firefighters. After the tests were scored, the city announced that it would fill open positions by drawing randomly from the top tier of scorers - those who received an 89 or higher. Those applicants were said to be "well qualified."

The city also advised those in a second tier (scoring from 65 to 88) that they had passed the test and were "qualified," but that they probably would not be hired given the large number of well- qualified applicants.

The city used this process 10 times from 1996 to 2002 to fill fire department vacancies. …

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Supreme Court Rules for African-Americans in Firefighter Hiring Case
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