World Makes Progress against Slavery, but 13 Nations Lag

By LaFranchi, Howard | The Christian Science Monitor, June 14, 2010 | Go to article overview

World Makes Progress against Slavery, but 13 Nations Lag


LaFranchi, Howard, The Christian Science Monitor


The US State Department's annual report on modern-day slavery cites greater determination worldwide to stamp it out. But 13 nations are on the list of sluggards neglecting the issue.

The United States is hailing growing determination in most corners of the globe to combat modern-day slavery through stepped- up law enforcement and legislative action. That's the good news.

But the State Department's annual report on human trafficking nevertheless brands 13 countries as standouts for failure to address rampant cases of sex trading, indentured domestic work, forced field labor, and other varieties of slavery within their borders.

The global scofflaws range from Kuwait and Saudi Arabia to North Korea and Cuba. The bright spots include Pakistan, Malaysia, Syria, Egypt, and Bosnia-Herzegovina - countries that don't always shine in annual human-rights ratings but that the State Department found have acted to address human-trafficking issues over the past year.

"We saw overall improvement," with 116 countries enacting legislation of some form in 2009 to combat human trafficking, says Luis CdeBaca, senior adviser on modern slavery issues to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The report estimates that more than 12 million people are trafficked globally every year.

For the first time, the US rated itself in the report, giving itself a "tier one," or top-tier, rating (along with most Western countries and Nigeria, which stands out in Africa as a tier one country) but recommending more training for federal, state, and local law enforcement officials to better detect and prosecute cases ranging from debt bondage to child prostitution.

In reviewing the 10th annual human-trafficking report, Ambassador CdeBaca said the State Department tallied more than 4,000 convictions worldwide in trafficking and slavery cases in 2009 - a 40 percent increase over the previous year. On the other hand, the global economic downturn means that more people facing deteriorating living conditions are finding fewer alternatives to forced labor - either in their own countries or in foreign locations to which they are trafficked.

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World Makes Progress against Slavery, but 13 Nations Lag
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