Michael Jackson: Prescription Drug Abuse a Major Lesson

By Daniel B Wood; Gloria Goodales | The Christian Science Monitor, June 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

Michael Jackson: Prescription Drug Abuse a Major Lesson


Daniel B Wood; Gloria Goodales, The Christian Science Monitor


Michael Jackson died a year ago from a physician-administered anesthetic. More than 20,000 people die each year from prescription- drug overdoses, some of whom get drugs from more than one doctor.

It's been a year since Michael Jackson's death from a powerful, doctor-administered anesthetic put the world spotlight on prescription drug abuse. But most analysts, academics, and patient advocate groups feel very little has been done to change the rules and procedures governing such drugs. "Since Michael Jackson's death, this problem has grown in the US," says Dr. David Kloth, board member, past president, and national spokesperson for American Society of Intervention Pain Physicians (ASIPP). "Celebrities are unfortunately good for this issue because they bring much needed attention to it."

One big problem, say Kloth and others, is that the regulation of medicine and prescription writing is constitutionally a state matter, which creates a lack of uniformity and loopholes.

IN PICTURES: The King of Pop

Along with the North American Neuromodulation Society - which represents 4,000 physicians - ASIPP is converging on Capitol Hill June 29 to push for wider prescription drug abuse monitoring.

ASIPP says more than 20,000 people die each year from prescription-drug overdoses, spurred by the growth of "doctor shopping" in which patients request care from multiple physicians, often simultaneously and across state lines, with no effort to coordinate care or inform the physicians about multiple caregivers. "The lack of uniform state regulation of the prescription drug industry is to blame," says Ron Washburn, professor of legal studies at Bryant University. "More and more instances are arising where an individual can see multiple doctors and get multiple prescriptions to either use or sell." One important move forward, say analysts, is the trend towards making patient databases instantly available. A federally-funded California program pushed forward by Attorney General Jerry Brown in the wake of Jackson's death, as well as those of Britany Murphy, Anna Nicole Smith, and Heath Ledger, was unveiled in the fall of 2009. Brown unveiled the new real-time, Internet- based prescription-monitoring database that provides physicians, pharmacists, and law enforcement officers a powerful technology to stop "drug seekers" from obtaining prescription drugs. "The recent deaths of Anna Nicole Smith and Michael Jackson have made clear to the whole world just how dangerous prescription drug abuse can be," said Brown at a press conference. …

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