At White House Summit on Community Colleges, All Hands on Deck

By the Monitor's Board | The Christian Science Monitor, September 28, 2010 | Go to article overview

At White House Summit on Community Colleges, All Hands on Deck


the Monitor's Board, The Christian Science Monitor


Next week, the White House hosts a summit on community colleges. The schools, so vital to training and job skills, need support from all sectors of society.

America's community colleges are in trouble, which is why the White House and Jill Biden will host a "summit" on the subject next week. The guest list is varied: educators and students, to be sure, but also philanthropists, businesspeople, and federal and state leaders.

The variety is important, because it will take a group effort to strengthen the nation's largest and most affordable means of higher education.

Given the central role that these two-year colleges also play in job training, they're especially needed now as the nation grapples with a 9.6 percent unemployment rate and a mismatch of skills in the economy.

Enrollment at these come-one, come-all schools has surged because of the Great Recession and great expense of private colleges. It's up 17 percent over the last two years, 30 percent over the last five. Many colleges have added "graveyard shift" or "early bird" classes to accommodate rising demand for courses on plumbing, nursing, or energy management.

Yet their budgets - dependent mostly on state and local revenues - haven't kept up. State operating revenues for community colleges are flat or negative in 37 states. The $12 billion commitment that the Obama administration made to community colleges in 2009 got whittled down to $2 billion by Congress.

The financial crunch is being acutely felt by students in states such as California, whose community colleges have seen three consecutive years of budget cuts. This is the largest network of community colleges in the nation - and the most affordable, charging only $26 per credit. But the system is turning students away for lack of courses.

Community colleges are underperforming in another important way. About half of their students will drop out before their second year. Only 25 percent finish in three years. Those who do finish need an average of five years to earn their associate degrees.

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