Mario Vargas Llosa Wins 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. Who Else Won in the Past Decade?

By Kurczy, Stephen | The Christian Science Monitor, October 7, 2010 | Go to article overview

Mario Vargas Llosa Wins 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. Who Else Won in the Past Decade?


Kurczy, Stephen, The Christian Science Monitor


Mario Vargas Llosa has won the 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. The Peruvian author and former presidential candidate received the prestigious Cervantes Prize in 1995 and is the first South American author to win the Nobel since Gabriel Garcia Marquez won the award in 1982. Here are the past decade's winners.

Mario Vargas Llosa has won the 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. The Peruvian author and former presidential candidate received the prestigious Cervantes Prize in 1995 and is the first South American author to win the Nobel since Gabriel Garcia Marquez won the award in 1982.

Here are the past decade's winners.

#10 2001: V. S. Naipaul

British writer V. S. Naipaul took the Nobel in 2001 "for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories," the awards committee said in a statement. He was born to Indian parents in the town of Chaguanas, on the island of Trinidad.

He has taken up India in both his fiction and his politics, aligning himself with right-wing Hindutva ideology. The New York Times said at the time: "Like many writers, Mr. Naipaul is often a better guide to the world in his prose than in his spoken remarks, which have resulted in accusations of homophobia and racism."

He has in the past declared the novel is dead, though he continues to write them.

#9 2002: Imre Kertesz

Hungarian writer Imre Kertesz took the Nobel in 2002 for "writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history," according to the committee statement. A survivor of Auschwitz concentration camp, Mr. Kertesz published his first novel in 1975, "Sorstalansag" (published as "Fateless" in 1992), about Hungarian Jews sent to the Nazi concentration camps in Poland.

According to the committee, "Kertesz's message is that to live is to conform. The capacity of the captives to come to terms with Auschwitz is one outcome of the same principle that finds expression in everyday human coexistence."

#8 2003: John M. Coetzee

South African-born writer John M. Coetzee won the Nobel Prize in Literature for 2003. Now a resident of Australia, Mr. Coetzee's novels are able to capture the "divine spark in man," according to the committee statement.

"Coetzee's interest is directed mainly at situations where the distinction between right and wrong, while crystal clear, can be seen to serve no end. Like the man in the famous Magritte painting who is studying his neck in a mirror, at the decisive moment Coetzee's characters stand behind themselves, motionless, incapable of taking part in their own actions."

#7 2004: Elfriede Jelinek

Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek won in 2004 for, according to the committee statement, "her musical flow of voices and counter- voices in novels and plays that with extraordinary linguistic zeal reveal the absurdity of society's cliches and their subjugating power."

Ms. Jelinek skipped the awards ceremony in Sweden, however. She explained her reason to The New York Times: "I would attend the ceremony if I were able to. But unfortunately I'm mentally ill with agoraphobia. I'm unable to be in crowds, and I can't bear to be looked at."

#6 2005: Harold Pinter

The late British playwright Harold Pinter produced 29 original stage plays, 27 screenplays, and numerous other essays, letters, and literary works. Mr. Pinter "in his plays uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression's closed rooms," the committee said in a statement awarding him the 2005 Nobel for Literature.

His style is so notable as to be called "Pinteresque," and he is best known for the plays "The Caretaker" and "Betrayal." The writer, who died in 2008, was a longtime pacifist, and was highly critical of the war in Iraq. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mario Vargas Llosa Wins 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. Who Else Won in the Past Decade?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.