Hu Jintao Bristles: Back off on Tibet and Taiwan

By LaFranchi, Howard | The Christian Science Monitor, January 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Hu Jintao Bristles: Back off on Tibet and Taiwan


LaFranchi, Howard, The Christian Science Monitor


Chinese President Hu Jintao, addressing business leaders in Washington, said any US-China relationship must be based on mutual respect, calling Tibet and Taiwan core Chinese interests.

Chinese President Hu Jintao used a lunch address with US business leaders Thursday to underscore the theme he has sought to establish for his state visit to Washington: Both countries as well as the world can benefit from enhanced US-China cooperation, but it must be cooperation based on mutual respect.

Just in case it was unclear to anyone what Mr. Hu meant, he spelled it out with two examples. The US, he said, must recognize that Taiwan and Tibet are "issues that concern China's territorial integrity and China's core interests."

In other words, stay out. Hu cited the examples a day after President Obama referred to Tibet and the Dalai Lama in a press conference with Hu, and just hours after Nancy Pelosi, House Democratic leader, brought up the issue of Tibet in a meeting with Hu.

The House minority leader also conveyed "the concerns ... on both sides of the aisle" over the continued detention of Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo, she said in a statement. Ms. Pelosi noted the fact that Mr. Liu was not permitted to travel to Norway in December to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Obama, the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, refrained from publicly citing Liu's case Wednesday.

Hu's words, delivered at a luncheon in his honor sponsored by the US-China Business Council and the National Committee on United States-China Relations, suggested areas of potential future tension - for example, if the US continues to sell arms to Taiwan. Military- to-military relations between China and the US are only now beginning to recover from the freeze they experienced after the Obama administration announced arms sales to Taiwan more than a year ago.

Those flies in the ointment aside, Hu focused mostly on the benefits for both countries of increased economic and security cooperation. Addressing the commonly held view in the US that China is more of an economic threat than an opportunity, Hu said that in fact, China had been a bright spot for US business through the global recession.

"For many US companies, their China operations have become the most profitable of their global operations," he said. …

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Hu Jintao Bristles: Back off on Tibet and Taiwan
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