Across 'Liberated' Eastern Libya, Volunteerism and a Pulling Together

By Murphy, Dan | The Christian Science Monitor, February 26, 2011 | Go to article overview

Across 'Liberated' Eastern Libya, Volunteerism and a Pulling Together


Murphy, Dan, The Christian Science Monitor


In Benghazi, Libya's second-largest city, one member of the transitional city council says that 'we have surprised even ourselves' as residents have stepped forward to maintain order.

The shrinking footprint of forces loyal to Libya's Muammar Qaddafi has spirits high in Benghazi, the country's second-largest city and one that is already free from his rule.

As US officials struggle to understand the quickly unfolding events, a predominant concern is that chaos and civil war could emerge after Mr. Qaddafi's one-man rule is dispatched - if he doesn't manage to sow it himself first.

But Umm Ahmed, head of the management committee for Benghazi's new transitional city council, has a message for Washington: Don't worry.

"Yes, there are no police, no institutions. Law and order as defined doesn't exist," she says. "But in practice, Benghazi is incredibly safe. Safer than it was under Qaddafi. People are all volunteering, the banks are opening. We surprised even ourselves."

President Obama, citing Qaddafi's use of "wanton violence" against his own people, issued an executive order Friday freezing the assets in the US of the Libyan government and Qaddafi's family, less than an hour after the last US diplomat was evacuated from Tripoli. The UN is considering sanctions of its own in New York today.

Qaddafi is still reportedly holed up in his Tripoli stronghold of Bab al-Aziziya, a neighborhood filled with his friends, clansmen, and thousands of soldiers who answer to his sons. He has remained defiant, barking threats and insisting that all true Libyans love him. There were reports today from the capital that he's distributing weapons to his supporters.

Though his rule seems finished, his rhetoric and actions are strong indications that there will be more blood to pay before this revolution succeeds.

Benghazi residents band together

But across 'liberated' eastern Libya, a spirit of volunteerism and pulling together is evident. At the "Voice of Free Libya," the country's first uncensored radio station in decades, people working there tell of strangers showing up with baskets of food. In the courthouse, an old man scrubs toilets - his way of doing something for the country, he says.

Jalal Galaal, a businessman who's acting to bring together the city council and local interests, says businessmen and government officials started showing up last week at the courthouse - a focal point for protesters - asking what should be done.

"The guy who runs the gas pumping station that feeds the power plants here showed up and said 'I need help,' " says Mr. Galaal. "We simply told him to get his people together and come up with a list. Wahda Bank said it needed protection.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Across 'Liberated' Eastern Libya, Volunteerism and a Pulling Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.