Graduate Schools of Business: Harvard (Gasp!) No Longer No. 1

By Miller, Mary Helen | The Christian Science Monitor, March 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Graduate Schools of Business: Harvard (Gasp!) No Longer No. 1


Miller, Mary Helen, The Christian Science Monitor


Graduate schools of business saw some reshuffling of rankings this year as US News & World Report downgraded perennial No. 1 Harvard and crowned a new undisputed champion. The business schools, part of US News's broader survey of all graduate schools, were ranked using nine measures. In one category, however, the Top 5 business schools were very evenly matched. Tuition ranged narrowly from $48,550 to $53,118 a year. Here's a look at the Top 5:

Graduate schools of business saw some reshuffling of rankings this year as US News & World Report downgraded perennial No. 1 Harvard and crowned a new undisputed champion. The business schools, part of US News's broader survey of all graduate schools, were ranked using nine measures. In one category, however, the Top 5 business schools were very evenly matched. Tuition ranged narrowly from $48,550 to $53,118 a year. Here's a look at the Top 5:

#6 University of Chicago

The University of Chicago's Booth School tied for the No. 5 spot. It is only of two graduate schools of business among the Top 5 that offers part-time, as well as full-time, enrollment for an MBA. Or, students can pursue an executive MBA in Chicago, London, or Singapore. MBA students may opt for a joint-degree with the schools of law, public policy, medicine, or social service administration. There are 1,177 full-time students and 1,639 part-time students. Tuition for full-time students is $50,900 per year.

The school has gotten even better ratings from Bloomberg Businessweek, which in November 2010 proclaimed it the nation's top business school. The magazine uses surveys of MBA graduates and recruiters, as well as a review of faculty research, to come up with its ranking. "Chicago has written the book on a number of the business fundamentals we now take for granted and I would encourage anyone who can, to be part of that history," wrote one graduate.

#5 Northwestern

Northwestern, which tied for the No. 5 spot, is the other business school in the Top 5 that offers a part-time course of study. It is also the top school for marketing. Students at the Kellogg School of Management can earn an MBA or PhD, and they can earn a joint MBA/JD or MBA and masters of engineering. There are 1,280 full-time students and 1,098 part-time students. Tuition is $51,495 for a full year, or $5,152 per credit.

The business school slipped a notch in the Bloomberg Businessweek rankings and stands at No. 4. Graduates raved about the academics but dissed the career office. Among the school's most famous graduates: Edwin Booz and James Allen, founders of the Booz Allen Hamilton consulting firm.

#4 University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania tied for the No. 3 spot. The Wharton School is the oldest business school in the country, and it ranked No. 1 for executive MBA and finance. Students can earn an MBA or PhD, or enroll in a dual MBA/JD or MBA/MA degree. …

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