Earth Day: Environmental Education Has Failed. but We Can Fix It

By Charles Saylan; Daniel T Blumstein | The Christian Science Monitor, April 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Earth Day: Environmental Education Has Failed. but We Can Fix It


Charles Saylan; Daniel T Blumstein, The Christian Science Monitor


Despite more than 40 years of Earth Day events and more environmental awareness now than ever, humanity continues to degrade the Earth. Environmental education hasn't translated awareness into action. Fortunately, there are easy ways to cut back our consumption.

We've both been participating in Earth Day events since they began back in 1970. We've manned booths that teach people about water pollution, we've organized environmental clean ups in the Santa Monica Bay and judged Earth Day posters at schools in Pakistan. But regardless of what we have done or where we have done it, we've been struck by one simple, glaring fact. Despite more than 40 years of organized Earth Day events, and the heightened awareness of environmental issues that they create, humanity collectively continues to degrade the Earth.

Since Earth Day began, we humans have fished down the seas, scoured the Earth for fossil fuels and rare earth elements, pumped more and more CO2 into the atmosphere, and created dead zones and Texas-sized garbage patches in our oceans and bays. How can this be? We're more environmentally aware than ever before.

The problem is that environmental education has failed to translate awareness into action. To be effective, it must go beyond creating awareness to creating measurable changes in our behavior. Our future and our children's future depend upon it. Fortunately, there are easy ways to cut back our consumption.

Where traditional environmental education went wrong

Everyone learns about pollution, either in school or from TV. Many of our K-12 schools teach children about the environment - and how to respect it. Some schools even take kids outside to learn about nature first hand. But somehow, environmental education has uniformly failed to teach us how to change our unsustainable behavior.

Traditional environmental education assumes that environmental awareness will somehow translate to action, but it doesn't teach how to take that action. Whatever action this education has produced has proven grossly insufficient to keep pace with environmental degradation. If this traditional "raising awareness" model works, why is public opinion shifting away from supporting any meaningful climate legislation. And why is it so easy for "climate-change deniers," often backed by industrial or oil business lobbyists, to discredit credible scientific opinion on climate change?

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