Truth Matters

By Editors of the Christian Science Sentinel | The Christian Science Monitor, August 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Truth Matters


Editors of the Christian Science Sentinel, The Christian Science Monitor


A Christian Science perspective: Why honesty and integrity matter, and the consequences of ignoring the truth.

"You are entitled to your own opinions, but you are not entitled to your own facts," the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan once famously said. Yet, if the logic of the saying seems obvious, the efforts to defy it seem endless.

During one recent week, the news reported on one high-profile US politician who was spotlighted for repeatedly retelling a moment of American history - and folding some invented "facts" into the retelling. That same week, another politician, from the opposing political party, told a series of untruths about events in his personal life. And across the Atlantic, a leader on the world stage told lies both to and about his people.

The habit of ignoring truth, whether in politics or elsewhere, degrades the public discourse. It slows momentum in the workplace and is a drag on the economy. At the same time, a pattern of truthfulness in speech and action elevates the political and nonpolitical conversation, and gets them back on a surer footing. Trust becomes more the norm, and reasserts its healthy impact on society. The truth matters - it matters to us all.

For anyone longing to expand the role of truth in both the public conversation and in private behavior, there is an invaluable tool available to anyone willing to take it up: prayer. It's not prayer that pushes this agenda or that point of view. Rather, it's prayer at its purest; prayer that humbly affirms the nature of God to be Truth itself - and the genuine nature of each one of us to be the likeness of God, of Truth.

In spiritual fact, it is as native to man (and woman) to speak truthfully, as it is native to God to do so. It is natural for the truth to put down roots in each human heart, and take up permanent residence there. This presence of God-derived truth, when realized in prayer, produces an inner urging to be honest. To do the right thing. To value accuracy over expediency. To stay true to God's directing.

Consider an example from the Old Testament, involving Balaam. To an extraordinary degree he seems to have grasped the need to remain true to God's commands above all else.

Balak, king of Moab, had directed Balaam to curse the Israelites, who were about to enter Canaan.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Truth Matters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.