Retirement Revised: Jerry Brown Proposes Pension Reform in California

By Knickerbocker, Brad | The Christian Science Monitor, October 27, 2011 | Go to article overview

Retirement Revised: Jerry Brown Proposes Pension Reform in California


Knickerbocker, Brad, The Christian Science Monitor


Other states, also struggling with budget problems, will be watching closely to see how California handles this key issue with its 1.6 million public employees and retirees.

California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) has laid out a tough public- employee retirement plan that guarantees a fight with labor unions and will be closely watched by other states struggling with budget problems.

Sorting out California's budget mess has been Job 1 for Governor Brown since the day he took office in January following the failure to find fiscal stability under previous governors, including most recently Arnold Schwarzenegger. The state and local governments face billions of dollars in unfunded liabilities due to what critics say are overly generous public-employee pension benefits accumulated over the years.

Announced Thursday, Brown's 12-point plan includes several dramatic changes to California's public-employee system, most of which would apply to new hires. Among the proposals:

- The retirement age for new, non-public-safety employees would be raised from 55 to 67. The retirement age for newly hired public- safety employees would be raised beyond the current 50 years to an age based on their ability to perform the job and maintain public safety.

- For new employees, pension benefits would be based on the highest average annual compensation for three years, rather than the current one-year system.

- All employees would be required to pay more toward their retirement and health care, and retirement pay for new employees would become a hybrid of traditional pensions and a 401(k)-type savings plan.

- Employees would be barred from buying service credits known as "air time" in order to boost retirement service credit for time not actually worked. Also banned would be "spiking" - giving an employee a raise shortly before retiring to boost their pension. - New state employees would be required to work for 15 years to become eligible for any state-funded health-care premiums in retirement and 25 years to qualify for the maximum state contribution to those premiums.

- Brown also wants to add two independent, public members with financial expertise to the board of the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), as well as make similar changes to other public retirement boards. …

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Retirement Revised: Jerry Brown Proposes Pension Reform in California
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