Separate Bomb Blasts Rock Nigeria's Newspapers, at Least Six Killed

By Garb, Ibrahim | The Christian Science Monitor, April 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

Separate Bomb Blasts Rock Nigeria's Newspapers, at Least Six Killed


Garb, Ibrahim, The Christian Science Monitor


While no one has taken credit for the twin blasts, the methods used in the attacks on the newspaper offices appear similar to those used by the Islamist fundamentalist group, Boko Haram.

Separate bomb blasts went off today at the offices of Nigeria's major national newspapers in two cities, killing at least six and injuring at least 25 others, in what appears to be coordinated attacks.

The explosion at the Abuja office of Thisday, an influential daily newspaper, occurred at about 11:45 a.m. local time. Around the same time as the Abuja blast, an explosion rocked the building that houses offices for the Daily Sun, The Moment, and Thisday in the northern city of Kaduna.

"NEMA officials are on the ground. They are trying to move those injured to the hospitals, but we don't have any information on casualties yet," said NEMA spokesperson, Yushau Shuaib.

While no one has taken credit for the blasts at the time of publication, the methods used in the attacks on the newspaper offices mirror those used by Boko Haram, the Islamist fundamentalist group, responsible for waging deadly attacks against the Nigerian government, United Nations offices, and against Christian churches and parishioners in the past two years.

Spokesman for the Nigerian Red Cross, Nwakpa O. Nwakpa, said a suicide bomber in Abuja rammed his car through the gates of the ThisDay office, driving into the reception area before detonating the bomb, killing and injuring people, and blowing out all the windows and the roof of the building.

The blast in Kaduna -- which is reported to have killed at least one person, according to policeman Mohammed Abubakar -- also involved a car with explosives, according to witnesses.

Idris Abdullahi, who works the New Nigerian newspaper that shares an office with ThisDay in Kaduna, said that people at the newspaper office surrounded the car, but the driver of the car opened the car and threw an object at the crowd. Mr. Abdullahi said that at least three people died in that blast.

Suspicion falls on Boko Haram, the Islamist fundamentalist group that has been waging a twin war in Nigeria to replace the country's current secular government with Islamic law of Sharia, and exterminate all forms of Western education. …

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Separate Bomb Blasts Rock Nigeria's Newspapers, at Least Six Killed
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