Why Voice of America Is Losing to Voice of Communist China - at Home and Abroad

By Bosco, Joseph A | The Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

Why Voice of America Is Losing to Voice of Communist China - at Home and Abroad


Bosco, Joseph A, The Christian Science Monitor


With funding and program cuts, Washington is crippling the truth- telling Voice of America broadcasts in China. Meanwhile, Beijing is aggressively expanding its media campaign to spread untruths - broadcasting from American soil. America can't afford to let the VOA go silent.

In the war of ideas between freedom and authoritarianism, the Voice of America (VOA) broadcast program is losing to the voice of communist China - not because Beijing's message is better but because its strategic vision and will to win surpass Washington's.

The United States government is unilaterally disarming (through funding and personnel cuts) much of its program of speaking truth to the Chinese people. Meanwhile, the People's Republic is aggressively expanding its campaign to spread untruths, especially about Western anti-China "plots." Worse, China's misinformation now openly targets the American people, as well - and does it from American soil.

Yet the Broadcast Board of Governors, which manages and oversees all US civilian international broadcasting, proposes cutting parts of its radio transmissions to China and Tibet as well as Burma, Laos, and Vietnam. The board plans to eliminate dozens of personnel directly or indirectly involved in local language broadcasts to those countries even as it adds scores of administrative positions despite budget constraints.

The board of governors proposed drastic reductions in its Mandarin radio broadcasts until Congress ordered a halt. It is now reviewing its plans for total elimination of the Cantonese program reaching China's most dynamic and democratic-leaning population. The rationale was that "audiences...prefer digital and social media."

By contrast, Beijing recognizes the continuing importance of radio and television to tens of millions of Chinese. The government- controlled China Central Television has just opened a new state-of- the-art broadcast bureau in Washington, D.C. as part of a major overseas expansion aimed at boosting China's international influence.

CCTV America is now producing news programs in English for an American audience - again, notwithstanding the even greater role of digital and social media in the United States. At the same time, CCTV transmits back to China - on radio and television - Beijing's official version of news and information from the United States.

China's official Xinhua News Agency is also expanding its overseas television operations. Known as CNC, the station broadcasts Chinese and English-language channels to almost 60 countries in the West and Asia.

Leaving no communications stone unturned, Beijing is not reluctant to utilize supposedly old-fashioned newsprint as well. It publishes the newspaper China Daily USA and distributes it free in America's cities. It also produces attractive inserts for leading American newspapers such as The Washington Post.

The Associated Press in Beijing reports that "[t]he expansion aims to counter negative images of China, especially over issues such as human rights, one-party communist rule, and Beijing's policies in the restive western regions of Xinjiang and Tibet."

China effectively employs an audacious two-track media strategy, applying soft power abroad and hard power at home. It extends its strategic communications outreach to the outside world, while tightening its grip over speech and expression within China. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Voice of America Is Losing to Voice of Communist China - at Home and Abroad
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.