Human Rights: Crucial to US Foreign Policy

By Feingold, Russ | The Christian Science Monitor, February 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

Human Rights: Crucial to US Foreign Policy


Feingold, Russ, The Christian Science Monitor


Has the issue of human rights become the neglected stepchild of American foreign policy? This question typically is raised during debates, especially where American economic interests are involved, and the answer often is unsatisfactory.

Consider America's policy toward Nigeria, which is currently under review by the Clinton administration. By virtue of its size and geographic location, Nigeria, which has suffered under military rule for most of its 40 years as an independent nation, is important in regional and international politics and critical to American interests. But Nigeria's future is being squandered by the current ruling junta, led by Gen. Sani Abacha. Rampant corruption, economic mismanagement, and brutal subjugation of Nigeria's people are the norm. The just-released 1997 State Department human rights report on Nigeria summed up the situation there as "dismal."

Nigeria has the potential to be an economic powerhouse on the African continent, a key regional political leader, and an important American trading partner. But presently, oil revenues are the only reliable source of economic growth, with the US purchasing an estimated 41 percent of the output. Corruption and criminal activity are common, including reports of drug trafficking and consumer fraud schemes. After the military annulled the 1993 election of Moshood Abiola as Nigeria's president - through what was considered by many to be a free and fair election - Chief Abiola was jailed, and there he remains, as far as we know, supposedly awaiting trial. Reliable information about his situation and condition is difficult to obtain. Abiola's wife was detained by authorities last year and later found murdered under circumstances suggesting the military may have been responsible. In October 1995, General Abacha announced a so-called "transition" program with the goal of returning an elected civilian government to Nigeria by October 1998. But even this flawed transition process moves at a snail's pace. A draft constitution has not been completed, and the registration process for political parties has been extremely restrictive. Any criticism of the transition process is punishable by five years in prison. Reports from international human rights organizations and the State Department document years of such brutality. Nigerian human rights activists and government critics are commonly whisked away to secret trials before military courts and imprisoned; independent media outlets are silenced; workers' rights to organize are restricted; and the State Security Detention of Persons Decree No. 2, giving the military sweeping powers of arrest and detention, remains in force. Perhaps the most horrific example of repression by the Abacha government was the execution of human rights and environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight others in November 1995 on trumped-up charges.

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