Lunar Ice Discovery: A Space Odyssey New Evidence of Water on the Moon Prompts Talk of Deeper Space Exploration

By Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 9, 1998 | Go to article overview

Lunar Ice Discovery: A Space Odyssey New Evidence of Water on the Moon Prompts Talk of Deeper Space Exploration


Peter N. Spotts, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Since the last American astronaut left footprints on the moon 25 years ago, human exploration of Earth's familiar companion has taken a back seat to space shuttles, a space station, and high-profile unmanned missions to places like Jupiter and Mars.

But with the confirmation last week that large amounts of ice or frost rest in the dark recesses of craters at the moon's poles, the moon's star may once again be on the rise.

Initial readings from the tiny Lunar Prospector spacecraft orbiting Earth's companion point to from 10 million to 300 million metric tons of water on the moon - enough to "enable a modest amount of colonization for centuries," says William Feldman, a researcher with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and a co-investigator on the Lunar Prospector team. Such a colony, or cluster of colonies, could well turn the moon into a lunar Legoland, where Mars-bound spacecraft or large structures for orbit could be built and launched for a fraction of the cost of building and launching them from Earth. "The implications are tremendous," says Alan Binder, the lead scientist on the Lunar Prospector project. Launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration on Jan. 7, the $63 million Lunar Prospector is the first of several dedicated moon missions planned for the coming years. Next year, Japan is scheduled to launch its Lunar-A spacecraft, which consists of an orbiter that will drop probes deep into the lunar surface, although not at the poles. Four years later, Japan hopes to launch Selene, which will put an unmanned lander on the moon to study its composition. Meanwhile, the European Space Agency is studying a proposal to put an orbiter around the moon in 2000, to be followed by a lander in 2001. The lander's target is the rim of a crater at the moon's south pole. Follow-up missions from the US may come first from the private sector. Dr. Binder says he wants to conduct 10 more missions - including sample return missions - with private financing through his Lunar Research Institute, based in Gilroy, Calif. He hopes to launch his first mission within the next two years. A start-up company on Long Island, Applied Space Resources Inc., is planning a sample return mission for the year 2000. Such missions, especially at the moon's poles, are needed to confirm Lunar Prospector's findings, mission scientists say, because while their craft's evidence is convincing, it is still indirect.

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