Teaching Dylan at Tennyson's Expense? A Recent Conference on the Songwriter Has Spurred Debate over Pop Culture's Place in Academia

By Paul Van Slambrouck, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 21, 1998 | Go to article overview

Teaching Dylan at Tennyson's Expense? A Recent Conference on the Songwriter Has Spurred Debate over Pop Culture's Place in Academia


Paul Van Slambrouck, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Bob Dylan has made a career out of irritating the establishment, and he's done it again.

While the man himself wasn't here on Jan. 17, a conference at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., honoring and examining the his work exposed a fault line in academia - just as his biting lyrics have laid bare personal and social conflict since he began recording music in the 1960s.

The first-of-its-kind gathering at an American university ran the works of the legendary songwriter through the kind of intellectual rigors long reserved for Shakespeare and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. And it's precisely the act of putting Mr. Dylan in such company that drives many in academia crazy. From the 300 college courses on Elvis's role in society to the establishment of a pop-culture department at Bowling Green University in Ohio, many academics see mounting evidence that today's fads are spreading as a subject of study on the university campus. While proponents argue that popularity and timeliness should not exclude a work from closer study, critics say that the established, more traditional curriculum is losing out. And it's a battle that's intensifying as a new generation of professors and administrators take the reins of the nation's academic institutions. "As much as I enjoy Bob Dylan, he doesn't warrant serious academic study," says Ron Rebholz, a professor of English at Stanford. "I think he's part of a general trend toward more pop culture at this university." Others go even further. "This trend toward Elvis and Dylan classes and conferences has to be seen as part of a context of disparagement of higher culture," says John Ellis, secretary of the Association of Literary Scholars and Critics and author of the 1997 book "Literature Lost." What is pop culture? Defining pop culture is clearly part of the problem. According to Charles M. Brown, who teaches a course on pop culture in society at Southern Illinois University, "It's typically those objects produced for mass consumption - music, art, clothing. I see it as a way to understand ourselves," he says. "And don't forget that anything we consider high culture was once pop culture." Indeed, many here saw the Saturday conference, which brought more than 400 mostly 40-somethings of graying ponytails and jeans people to Stanford, as a way to give Dylan's insights the recognition and thought they deserve. "I hope he becomes part of the academic canon," says Tino Markworth, a Stanford doctoral student who worked with Rehm on the class and conference. "Pop culture? That's the Spice Girls and rap music. That's not what this is about. We've focused on him {Dylan} as an artist and he's worthy of serious investigation." Even critics concede pop culture can be worthy of sociological study, as a phenomenon in and of itself. …

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