College Texts on Marriage: No Happy Endings

By Glenn, Norval D. | The Christian Science Monitor, June 29, 1998 | Go to article overview
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College Texts on Marriage: No Happy Endings


Glenn, Norval D., The Christian Science Monitor


About 2.5 million American couples are expected to marry this year.

A good share of them - 225,000 - will take their vows this month, as large numbers of young people graduate from college.

Ironically, most brides and grooms who've taken college courses about the family will marry in spite of what they've been taught in the textbooks used in those courses. I recently studied 20 college texts on family for a report by the Institute for American Values Council on Families. All of the books focused on negative aspects of marriage and child-rearing. Not one provides much reason why anyone should want to marry. A few of the books have a distinctly antimarriage animus, and the others fail to discuss the large body of research indicating the psychological and health benefits of marriage, or mention it only briefly and superficially. 'Proof' marriage harms Several of the books claim, erroneously, that there is proof that marriage is typically harmful to women. For instance, one sociology of the family textbook, "Changing Families," cites a controversial 1972 book by sociologist Jessie Bernard, and states that Ms. Bernard found "the psychological costs of marriage were great for women." Personal happiness Another text, "Sociology of Marriage and the Family," asserts that "we do know, for instance, that marriage has an adverse effect on women's mental health." Yet another text, "Diversity in Families," admits that married people on average report a much higher level of personal happiness than unmarried people. But it goes on to cite Ms. Bernard's work - which was unsupported by sophisticated research - that married women tend to say they are happy only because they think they should be happy. The book reports this thesis as fact rather than as the speculation that it is. And it ignores later, more well-grounded research that indicates that reports of personal happiness are equally valid for men and women. It's hard to imagine a topic more relevant to the needs and interests of college students than the effects of marriage on personal well-being. But the books I reviewed devoted on average just over a page each - out of an average of more than 600 pages per book - to this topic. Five of the books don't discuss the topic at all, and five others devote only a sentence to less than a page to it. Furthermore, almost half of the discussion of the effects of marriage on personal well-being is of Bernard's discredited thesis that marriage typically harms women.

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