The Best, and Worst, Job in Texas after a 28-Year Drought, University of Texas Football Fans Are Pinning Their Hopes on New Coach, Mack Brown

By Douglas S. Looney, Senior sports columnist of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 1, 1998 | Go to article overview

The Best, and Worst, Job in Texas after a 28-Year Drought, University of Texas Football Fans Are Pinning Their Hopes on New Coach, Mack Brown


Douglas S. Looney, Senior sports columnist of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


New University of Texas football coach Mack Brown is at his leisure around a coffee table in his office, wearing jeans and being expansive about what it's like to be in charge of one of the most storied teams in the land.

A big plus, he says, is that many of the boosters and supporters are "really smart, really powerful and very interested." A big minus, he says, is that many of the boosters and supporters are "really smart, really powerful and very interested."

Brown laughs a Texas-size laugh: "This is a great job and great jobs are hard." Plus, they are perilous, especially at this school which ranks behind only Michigan and Notre Dame in total wins and has appeared on television more times than anybody. When you lose at Texas, watch your back. Texans understand frontier justice and have no qualms about its application. Last year, Texas - figured at last to be a national championship contender again - strutted onto its home field for its second game, whereupon it was promptly thrashed by lightly regarded UCLA, 66-3. It was the worst home defeat ever. The Eyes of Texas filled with tears of remorse and regret - and anger. By season's end, the Longhorns had collapsed to 4-7 and may not have been that good. It has been 41 autumns since Texas had a worse record. Yet, even worse, if possible, last year wasn't all that different from too many other years over several decades. Texas football keeps bumping along at nadirs and wondering if the zeniths will ever return. Spring is the season of rebirth for college football, a 15-day window of practice allowed under NCAA rules. It's a crucial time when coaches get a chance to see how much improvement the players have made since the end of last season - or, perish the thought, how much they have digressed. Spring football sets the foundation for the fall season and serves to revivify hope. Here in Texas, football fans are consumed with the fact that it has been 28 miserable years since their beloved albeit underachieving Longhorns last won a national championship. They haven't been genuinely happy since Darrell Royal coached the team to 11 Southwest Conference championships between 1957 and '76 and brought them three national championships in 1963, 1969, and 1970. They are desperate in their support of Mack Brown, spirited away five months ago from North Carolina. Says one athletic official, "If Mack can't do it, it can't be done." The point is, defensive coordinator Carl Reese says, "When you grow up in football, Texas is football." Mack Brown's last stop Brown understands: "We have a responsibility to this state because it is a football culture. Whether that's right or wrong doesn't matter. It is. I know I can do this job. If they let me stay long enough, we'll win. This is my last stop. I have never been fired and I'm not going to get fired here. I am going to enjoy all the fans and those fans who get mad at me, well, I won't enjoy them as much. I want Texas football to be what I remember." Says Dusty Renfro, a linebacker, of Brown, "He has an air of confidence about him second to none." Darrell Royal, one of the three or four all-time best-ever football coaches, gave this piece of advice to Brown: "Smile." Brown has that down. Asked if Texas will be any good this fall, he says, "Probably not. We were 4-7 last year and all the guys are back." He's right, 17 returning starters, 40 lettermen. Still, given the schedule, 7-4 is doable, if UCLA and Kansas State don't demoralize the 'Horns on back-to-back September Saturdays. Brown - hired because he's the hottest coach in the game - dreams the dreams of dreamers ("I'd like to win every football game with nice kids and within the rules'') but he also understands reality as he did when UT President Larry Faulkner told him, "You need to win." Says Brown, "I wonder if he thought I hadn't thought of that." Already, Brown, who seems to have it all - personality, talent, drive, temperament - is wowing the populace. …

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