Giving Parents a Peek at School Lesson Plans New Bill Winding Its Way through Congress Would Let Them Review Materials

By Lawrence J. Goodrich, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 15, 1998 | Go to article overview
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Giving Parents a Peek at School Lesson Plans New Bill Winding Its Way through Congress Would Let Them Review Materials


Lawrence J. Goodrich, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When a group of parents in Chapel Hill, N.C., obtained the reading materials for the school system's "multicultural action plan for the promotion of respect for diversity," they were upset by what they saw.

A required English course included works by gay and lesbian authors that contained material the school board would not allow to be read out at a public meeting, says John Reinhard, a biologist whose son is a local high school student.

"If the salacious depiction of homosexual, sadomasochistic behavior might be inappropriate for a school-board meeting, why would it be suitable for our children?" Mr. Reinhard asked a recent hearing of a House subcommittee. Opinions about what is or isn't appropriate for school use vary widely. Some parents' groups have objected to students reading Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" because it ends in teenage suicide, or Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" because it deals with witchcraft. So a group of mostly conservative House Republican lawmakers has responded to complaints from parents about the content of school curricula, tests, and surveys, introducing the Parental Freedom of Information Act. The proposal would require states and local schools to let parents review textbooks, manuals, and audiovisual materials used in the classroom. In addition, parents would have the right to see any testing materials administered to students, except for copyrighted exams. The measure would also require written permission from a parent before any student could be required to undergo any medical, psychological, or psychiatric testing or treatment while at school, except in emergencies. In the event of a dispute, the measure provides for mediation and arbitration at the school district's expense. The bill's sponsors, led by Rep. Todd Tiahrt (R) of Kansas, say they mean to clarify the 1974 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, which requires that parents have the right to their children's school records. "This legislation is about removing barriers from including parents in their children's education," Representative Tiahrt says. He says he introduced the legislation after "an alarming number" of cases in which parents had to file lawsuits to gain access to materials used in schools. "Plain and simple, parents should not have to go into the courtroom to find out what is going on in their child's classroom." Ahead of the curve Some school districts already have these types of policies in place. Jim Means, principal of Wichita High School West in Wichita, Kan., told the subcommittee that public schools in his city allow parents to inspect any instructional materials, including teacher's manuals. "Need for this policy became apparent as district programs approached sensitive materials, such as sex and AIDS education, {and} advisement programs, which included goal-setting and decisionmaking," Mr.

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