Mixing Tribal Traditions and US Law Program Gives Native Americans Access to One of the Nation's Most Powerful Professions

By Scott Baldauf, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 5, 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Mixing Tribal Traditions and US Law Program Gives Native Americans Access to One of the Nation's Most Powerful Professions


Scott Baldauf, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Like many new law school graduates, Valerie Davidson has grand career goals. But she's not heading for Wall Street or Washington - at least not yet.

She's going to work for her tribe, the Yup'ik nation in Alaska. But she wouldn't have had the opportunity, she says, unless she had attended a special summer program for native American students at the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque.

"It was crazy ... but it was one of the best experiences of my life," she says in between hugs of congratulations from her fellow students and her family, who came from all the way from Bethel, Alaska, for her graduation. For Ms. Davidson and thousands of native Americans like her, the program has been a revelation. For years, most tribes simply hired white lawyers to represent them, rather than try to understand the intricacies of a legal system so different from their own cultures. But as tribes have taken an increasingly active part in commerce, whether through casinos or oil exploration, the need for people who understand both Indian traditions and US law has grown. Over the past 30 years, UNM's Pre-Law Summer Institute for native Americans has helped fill that void. During that time, the number of native American lawyers has swelled from 20 to more than 2,000 - and UNM has produced more of them than any other school in the country. The program has given an often-disenfranchised group access to one of the nation's most influential professions, while instilling in many Indians a greater faith in tribal courts and the people representing them to the outside world. Basically, the UNM program gives native Americans a crash course in legal terms and logic to help them survive the crucial first semester of law school. "It's like a boot camp," says Davidson. When they graduate, many of UNM's "legal warriors" head off for the reservations, where they serve as tribal attorneys or judges. Others work for law firms that represent tribes or federal or state government agencies that deal with Indian issues. "Whenever I have a meeting with my senior staff, they are all graduates of that summer program," says Kevin Gover, director of the US Bureau of Indian Affairs and member of the UNM class of 1981. "This school has played a profound role in the development of American Indian law. It has created the policy leadership of the Indian country." A new respect On a local level, some judges have noted that tribal members who at one time might have been loath to trust tribal courts are now much more likely to use the legal system.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Mixing Tribal Traditions and US Law Program Gives Native Americans Access to One of the Nation's Most Powerful Professions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?