Weak by Design, Japan Ponders Its Missile Gap North Korea Test Reminds Economic Giant of Its Weakness and Reliance on US

By Cameron W. Barr, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Weak by Design, Japan Ponders Its Missile Gap North Korea Test Reminds Economic Giant of Its Weakness and Reliance on US


Cameron W. Barr, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


North Korea is in a tricky neighborhood for missile testing. Shooting a rocket into China or Russia would be like pricking a bear with a needle. Lobbing a missile over South Korea - a nation perpetually coiled in anticipation of an attack from the North - would also invite trouble.

That leaves only one option: Firing over Japan, the only country in the region that won't shoot back. Japan is an economic giant, but in some ways it is also a weakling, and the Aug. 31 missile test has stung the Japanese with fresh reminders of their vulnerability.

"We have been trying to forge peaceful and friendly relations with North Korea, but the firing of the missile is nothing but betrayal," complains Yoshiro Mori, the secretary general of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.

The day after North Korea sent a ballistic missile arcing over the northern part of Japan, officials in Tokyo acknowledged that Japan was entirely dependent on the United States for information about the test. It also had to admit that its defense against missiles - the Patriot system used by the US in the Gulf War - is inadequate against the type North Korea demonstrated.

Although the North Koreans tested a missile capable of reaching some parts of Japan in 1993, this most recent test showed off a missile with a much longer range. The awareness that North Korea can land a warhead just about anywhere in Japan may encourage Japan's government to undertake a costly missile-defense project in cooperation with the US. But analysts say there won't be a significant shift in the way Japanese think about security.

As much as the Japanese are sometimes frustrated by their frailties and reliance on America, they know that for now, it must be thus. "Nothing will change fundamentally," says Akira Kato, a defense specialist at Obirin University in Tokyo. "The dependence on the US will always be there." According to a 1960 treaty, the US is bound to defend Japan from attack, and it backs up the pledge by maintaining an aircraft carrier, a division of US Marines, and thousands of other troops at bases here.

Japan's well-equipped military, called the Self-Defense Forces, are constrained by a pacifist Constitution that was drafted under US supervision after World War II. So while some officials yearn for a spy satellite that could detect a missile launch, even the North Korean test may not give them the momentum to overcome legal restrictions against using space for military purposes. …

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Weak by Design, Japan Ponders Its Missile Gap North Korea Test Reminds Economic Giant of Its Weakness and Reliance on US
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