Is This Mandela's Way of Peace? S. Africa Military Enter Lesotho Troops Sent Sept. 22 to End Anarchy Sparked by Protests against Election Result. Buthelezi Is in Command

By Kate Dunn, | The Christian Science Monitor, September 23, 1998 | Go to article overview

Is This Mandela's Way of Peace? S. Africa Military Enter Lesotho Troops Sent Sept. 22 to End Anarchy Sparked by Protests against Election Result. Buthelezi Is in Command


Kate Dunn,, The Christian Science Monitor


When does "people power" become anarchy, forcing a "big power" to intervene?

It's a tough question for the new South Africa, whose president, Nelson Mandela, is determined to spread democracy throughout the troubled African continent.

Mr. Mandela lives with the legacy of the former apartheid government that tried to impose its will on the rest of southern Africa through military intervention. Mandela would rather "jaw-jaw" than "war-war," putting him in conflict with the presidents of Zimbabwe, Namibia, and Angola. In August, they thumbed their noses at Africa's most important leader by intervening militarily in the messy Congo conflict and thus defeating Mandela"s diplomatic efforts.

Closer to home, Mandela learned this week that sometimes only might will set things right. Just before dawn Sept. 22, some 600 South African soldiers crossed into the tiny kingdom of Lesotho.

For much of its history, Lesotho's politics was influenced by South Africa's apartheid government, which installed and deposed leaders at will.

Mangosuthu Buthelezi, who is acting president while Mandela is traveling abroad, told Parliament yesterday that military intervention was justified because the Lesotho capital of Maseru is "a city under siege." He read from "desperate" letters from embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili, who on Sept. 16 and 19 begged South Africa and other nations of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to send in a peacekeeping force to reestablish order. Two hundred troops from Botswana were expected to join the South Africans.

For seven weeks, Lesotho opposition parties and civilians have maintained a vigil in front of King Letsie's palace to push their view that the May 23 elections won by Mr. Mosisili's Lesotho Congress for Democracy were rigged. The vigil turned into a siege in the past 10 days, with youths hijacking government vehicles, chasing government officials from offices, and snipers shooting at Cabinet ministers.

The opposition parties claim widespread electoral fraud allowed the government to win 79 out of 80 seats with just 61 per cent of the vote.

Mandela has taken up the issue with his colleagues in the SADC, a regional organization he believes can build peace and prosperity in Africa. A South African supreme court justice investigated the Lesotho elections. He delivered his report to Mandela earlier this month. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Is This Mandela's Way of Peace? S. Africa Military Enter Lesotho Troops Sent Sept. 22 to End Anarchy Sparked by Protests against Election Result. Buthelezi Is in Command
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.