Music Practice Time Turns into Playtime

By Greenwood, Marta | The Christian Science Monitor, August 26, 1998 | Go to article overview

Music Practice Time Turns into Playtime


Greenwood, Marta, The Christian Science Monitor


I have absolutely no knowledge of music, short of a deep love for it. But when our daughters were born, we decided to give them the gift of music. We listened to classical music at mealtime, in the car, and as background music while reading.

When they were 3 and 5, the girls started music lessons. We chose the Suzuki method. Little did I know what I was letting myself in for.

I had to learn each piece of music with them. The first songs were easy, but only as far as "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." Soon, the entire family was involved. My husband wrote the names of the notes above each note, then I would learn the piece and we would practice together.

Soon it became evident that I was slowing my daughters down!

Gradually, my role became less and less. The girls took off on their own, but not without encouragement and a high degree of creative imagination on my part. I became adept at keeping the practices fun and their love of music alive.

We turned practice time into play time.

At a handicraft shop, we bought an unfinished floral picture with ready-cut felt shapes. For every section of their music that they learned to play correctly, they would choose one part of the picture to make. Our walls are still adorned with many of these pictures.

If they had a difficult piece to learn, they would choose a small gift from a favorite shop and it was put on a high shelf. On the day they learned the music, it was their prize. We have many soft cuddly toys named after composers that commemorate their successes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Music Practice Time Turns into Playtime
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.