Concerned about Retirement? It's Not as Bad as It Looks

By Francis, David R. | The Christian Science Monitor, November 4, 1998 | Go to article overview

Concerned about Retirement? It's Not as Bad as It Looks


Francis, David R., The Christian Science Monitor


Reading the papers, one might think many future retirees face a serious risk of becoming bag ladies and bums. But it isn't so grim.

The financial position of Americans on the verge of retirement is not nearly as bad as often pictured in the media, says Alan Gustman, an economist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

In fact, each household of this group has on average about a half million dollars in assets. That includes the value of private and Social Security pensions, as well as homes and other assets. The wealth number comes from a detailed survey of 7,600 families with at least one member born from 1931 to 1941. Professor Gustman figures this wealth estimate is conservative. That's because the survey was done in 1992 and some calculations are based on that year. Since then stock prices have soared, lifting the wealth of many of those nearing retirement. Gustman's study, done with another economist, Thomas Steinmeier of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, doesn't look specifically at retirement prospects for baby boomers. But Gustman suspects this numerous group has a somewhat different asset mix. They may have more 401(k) annuities that many firms offer employees nowadays and fewer traditional "defined benefit" corporate pensions. But any difference in asset levels should be "modest," he says. With the campaign to privatize Social Security, economists have been looking more closely at retirement finances. For example, another Dartmouth professor, Andrew Samwick, has found that as much as one-fourth of the trend toward earlier retirement in the post-World War II years can be attributed to the spread of employer-provided pensions for workers. Between 1950 and 1989, the proportion of men aged 65 and over still working in jobs decreased from 46 percent to 17 percent, and for those aged 55 to 64, from 87 percent to 67 percent. Over the same period, labor force participation rates for women 65 and over fell slightly from 9.7 to 8.4 percent, and the rapid increase in participation for women 55 to 64 essentially stopped. Better pensions make early retirement more feasible. In the last decade, 401(k) plans have become highly important to retirement welfare. …

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